Blogosphere

Heart Beat

Manitou Messenger - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 10:00pm

I know it is only early November, but because my schedule operates wholly around the next break for school, I am, of course, already thinking of Thanksgiving. What a wonderful time! Can you name a more American holiday? A gauzy guise of gratitude wrapped around a history of colonization and contemporary commercialism. I do love America.

“Heart beat” is all about relationships. And some of the biggest relationships in our life aren’t romantic but familial. Thanksgiving is the perfect time to run into those family members we normally do not associate with. That’s right. I’m talking about The Racist Uncle (Don’t let the male-implying “uncle” confuse you, The Racist Uncle can be anyone).

So what do you do with these difficult family members? Family members who might even negate your existence, like The Racist Uncle who is a giant homophobe, or The Racist Uncle who thinks all atheists are going to hell, or The Racist Uncle who is literally a racist, Heart beat is coming through to write you a brief survival guide (Note: This is mostly for entertainment purposes. If you need further help with The Racist Uncle, I recommend you seek help from a professional at Boe House, a good friend or a trusted mentor).

The first thing you can do about The Racist Uncle is spend some time reflecting on your past interactions and how you want to act during future Thanksgivings. It sucks, but at the end of the day, you can’t really control them – you can only control your reaction to them. So how are you going to react? Do you want to get into an argument or discussion? Or would you rather avoid it? What started your poor interactions in the past? Can you avoid the situations that instigated them?

Use this time to set some healthy boundaries for yourself. Maybe decide you are not going to talk about politics or you are going to pick your battles. Because yes, Thanksgiving is a great time to start important conversations. You could try to talk to Grams about why Black Lives Matter is an important movement. If you have the energy for it, that could be really good! But you need to place yourself first. Sometimes it’s better to take care of your own needs and well-being before setting out to change the world. Chances are, you won’t change that person’s mind over one dinner, and you shouldn’t put the pressure of trying to change them on yourself. As the incredible Audre Lorde once said, “Caring for myself is not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare.” Choose yourself over fighting an ideological battle across a stuffing-filled table.

The next thing you can do is assemble your allies. Talk to the sibling, or partner, or cousin or parent who is going to have your back. Tell them how you’re feeling about The Racist Uncle. Maybe set up a signal for them to step in and provide an escape route if you are getting overwhelmed. If nothing else, this gives you someone to exchange bewildered glances with across the table or gossip with later on in the evening. If this person doesn’t exist at your Thanksgiving dinner, have a friend on standby to text later.

Of course, we all know that sometimes, The Racist Uncle is not just one person and texting a friend is not always enough when it is your whole family – if Thanksgiving is that bad, don’t go home. Stay on campus and take advantage of the cool opportunity of some professors opening their homes to students on the holiday, or head home with your roommate instead. If nothing else, it provides more data to inform your life-long quest for the best sweet potato recipe.

Finally, remember the literal meaning of Thanksgiving. Thanks, giving. Giving thanks. Take some time to be grateful for the amazing people and communities in your life that are not The Racist Uncle. Those relationships are our fuel and our fire, keeping us sane and moving every day. So take a moment to thank them and be grateful. You can survive the holidays!

hawtho1@stolaf.edu

Having trouble navigating the St. Olaf dating scene? E-mail your questions to mess-ae@stolaf.edu and maybe one of our love columnists will answer them in next week’s issue. All submitted questions will remain anonymous.

Categories: Colleges

St. Olaf’s efforts to increase retention

Manitou Messenger - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 9:57pm

St. Olaf has spearheaded several efforts to retain and enroll more students.
While the College maintains high retention compared to similar institutions, the percentage of retained students has fallen in recent years, as the Messenger reported in March 2019. Due to this recent drop, the College developed a Retention Committee, comprised of twelve faculty and staff members, to explore what has been done and what needs to be done to increase student retention, said Vice President for Student Life Hassel Morrison.

The current Retention Committee began as a task force in academic year 2017-18 and does not utilize a working budget in its efforts. Rather, the Committee is in place to develop specific goals for retention, assess current programs across campus and establish pilot programs for working to retain students, Morrison said.

As an institution, St. Olaf maintains a goal of reaching 95 percent first-to-second year student retention, which sits 5 percent above the 90 percent mark observed in 2018 by the College in its Institutional Effectiveness and Assessment data.

One area of emphasis for retention efforts targets sophomore students, which Morrison identified as a group that does not get enough attention yet is critical for maintaining high retention rates.

The emphasis on sophomore students is highlighted by the lack of attention given to this group at other institutions, Morrison said. Morrison also alluded to data which has shown that a majority of students who leave their respective institutions do so around sophomore year.

To focus these efforts, the College created the Sophomore Year Experience Committee, chaired by the Joshua Lee, assistant dean of students for programming and assessment. The Committee is currently assessing the possible need for a Sophomore Year Experience, Morrison said. The Experience could include an event during Week One welcoming sophomores back to campus with a “celebration,” according to a Retention Programs and Interventions report provided to the Messenger by Morrison.

Other programs and interventions outlined in the report include alumni and staff mentoring programs for TRIO McNair Scholars and LGBTQIA+ students, and the changing of Academic Dismissal to Academic Suspension for struggling students. The suspension would allow students to take necessary time off and return to classes a semester or a year later, Morrison said.

In addition to specific institutional programs or strategies, there is a need to develop a more supportive campus culture for retaining “our friends and our family here at the College,” Morrison said.

“Retention is actually a community effort,” Morrison said. “We’re trying to continue the idea that it’s not one person’s responsibility, it’s a community responsibility.”
Looking forward, the College should assess its technological infrastructure to ensure that it is supporting student success and retention, Morrison said. The changes to the class registration and Student Information Systems are one example of new technological infrastructure.

“Retention is actually a community effort. We’re trying to continue the idea that it’s not one person’s responsibility, it’s a community responsibility.”
– Hassel Morrison

“Anything that would make it accessible and easier for students and faculty, and staff, to navigate,” Morrison said. This would not require any investment upfront, but would rather encompass a general assessment of current process and recommendations for improvements, Morrison said.

And Morrison offered that a comparative approach could be used to assess current infrastructure.

“We may find that we’re in a good place,” Morrison said. “But it’s always smart to look into how we measure up.”

Finally, Morrison said that he wants the College to hire a retention specialist that could devote more time to assess the College’s retention efforts and foster communication between relevant groups across campus. Part of this role would include emphasizing what St. Olaf currently excels at in regards to retention.

“I think that we need to do a better job of celebrating the things we do well,” Morrison said. “And also making people aware of the things that are going great, so we are able to have a multi-faceted approach to how we look at retention.”

marand1@stolaf.edu

Categories: Colleges

Marc Lamont Hill lectures in Boe Chapel

Manitou Messenger - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 9:56pm

The Political Awareness Committee (PAC) hosted academic, activist and author Marc Lamont Hill on Nov. 7 to deliver a lecture titled “Building Community in an Hour of Chaos: Transnational Alliances and the Politics of Affinity” and participate in two Q&As with students as the committee’s most prominent speaker of fall semester.

PAC, a branch of the Student Government Association (SGA), works all year to bring political speakers, movies and other events to campus for St. Olaf students. Every year, PAC plans for a fall speaker and a spring speaker, alongside other guests.
According to PAC Coordinator Or Pansky ’20 the purpose of these events and speakers is to discuss the “existential condition that we are a part of that’s in need of naming and critiquing.”

Dr. Marc Lamont Hill is the host of BET news, a former political contributor to CNN and an award-winning journalist. He is also professor of media studies and urban education at Temple University and an author or co-author of four books.
Before the evening lecture, Hill participated in a Q&A with students from courses that align with his work and the message of his speech. At the opening of the event, Pansky introduced Hill and addressed meaningful political and social topics, such as decolonization and campus diversity.

In his lecture, Hill focused on building a sense of community during a time of political chaos, which he described as when “intellectuals are silenced” and “sections of our public are disposable.” To foster a sense of community, Hill emphasized the need to listen and to build a “united front.”

He also touched on topics such as prison reform, racism, the Middle East and political activism. After his speech, Hill responded to audience questions about subjects ranging from cancel culture to Palestine.

During the address, Hill emphasized the importance of imagination and self care. He explained how students should “dream bigger” and “act courageously,” even when activism can be difficult.

“This stuff is lonely,” Hill said, regarding activist actions. “But we don’t have to be prisoners.”

Future PAC events are currently in the works and may soon be announced. Pansky said the spring speaker is yet to be determined, but made it clear that Hill’s lecture was a success.

“He gave a really incredible talk,” Pansky said. “We work to bring speakers who focus on our position critically in the world, and for the fall speaker, that was Marc Lamont Hill.”

larion1@stolaf.edu

Categories: Colleges

St. Olaf participates in first-generation celebration week

Manitou Messenger - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 9:56pm

St. Olaf hosted several events across campus to celebrate and learn from the experiences of first-generation students Nov. 4-8 as part of the National First-Generation College Celebration. The Center for Advising and Academic Support (CAAS), Nepantla First Generation Honor House, Piper Center, Taylor Center, TRIO McNair Scholars Program and TRIO Student Support Services and Board of Leaders organized these campus-wide events.

President David Anderson’74 sent an email to St. Olaf students on Oct. 29 inviting the community to participate in the celebration. The Council for Opportunity in Education (COE) and the Center for First-generation Student Success organized the first national celebration in 2017, and this is the second year St. Olaf participated in the event.
The events during the week encouraged conversations,spread awareness of first-generation students and highlighted resources available for first-generation students on campus.

“[First-generation students should] realize that they are very resilient,” said Janis Johnson, director of the TRIO McNair Scholars Program at St. Olaf. “They should be very proud of the work they are doing here in St. Olaf and what they contribute to the community.”

Melissa Melgar, Assistant Director of TRIO McNair Scholars Program, expressed that during the reflections that took place in the events of the week, first-generation students were able to “stop and reflect on what does being a first-generation student really mean to [them].”

Johnson emphasized that this was also “a moment to realize the impact that being a first-generation student not only brings to them, but to their entire family and even community.”

Hearing stories from other first-generation students and professors at St. Olaf encouraged current students to continue fighting against the obstacles and challenges they face, and to be proud of where they come from and what they have achieved, the two directors said.

Johnson believes programs such as TRIO, that look to provide opportunities for first-generation students, are necessary for a good educational environment.
“They are designed to level the playing field, in terms of educational opportunities,” Johnson said.

Melgar expanded on the importance of TRIO to future student development.
“They help diversify who is at the table making decisions, who is pursuing those degrees, who is becoming the CEO of the next generation, who is becoming that doctor,” Melgar said.

Through conversations with first-generation alumni and professors, and the closing event, “First-Gen Stories,” students were given the chance to share their own personal experiences. These discussions centered around experiences such as how being first-generation has changed students and affected their lives and their aspirations, as well as asking students to share their motivations, which could include family goals or simply owing it to themselves. Finally, the closing event encouraged first-generation students to acknowledge that after having achieved everything they wanted, they will know that it will be because they worked for it.

Overall, the first-generation celebration encouraged topics, such as what it means to be a first-generation student and how to overcome obstacles that come with this identity, to be put out on the table and actively discussed and reflected upon.

veraes1@stolaf.edu

Categories: Colleges

Campus improvement projects to come

Manitou Messenger - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 9:55pm

St. Olaf is renovating Steensland Hall and lab space in Regents, and adding climate controlled storage to the library over the next several years as part of its six-year development plan.

The plan also includes four projects completed over the summer, like renovations to Rand Hall and Skoglund Gymnasium.

The College capital budget sits at $9 million for fiscal year 2019-20, of which $5.5 million goes towards ongoing capital projects. The budget will increase to $9.5 million in 2020-21, with $6 million for continued projects, as outlined in a capital budget report obtained by the Messenger.

“The capital budget is kind of the big, one-time projects that we need to spend money on,” said Vice President for Budget and Auxiliary Operations Angela Mathews. “We fund our capital budget with our depreciation. So it’s the cash we have left over at the end of the day, we put towards our capital budget.”

The depreciated funds stem from larger projects that necessitate setting aside funds for yearly upkeep and natural deterioration. St. Olaf reinvests these funds into ongoing capital projects, a process that is unique from that of other institutions.
“A lot of schools don’t do that – they just appreciate and they don’t put that money back into their buildings,” Mathews said. “So I think our facilities are in a much better place because we reinvest.”

The Regents project is one example of this reinvestment. The project began its two-year process this year, with $85,000 of the $385,000 total budget used in 2019-20. It will modify vacant space to relocate one psychology lab, while renovating lab space to provide a “multi-disciplinary wet lab space for biology, psychology, and neuroscience,” according to the project summary.

Of the three ongoing capital ventures, the Regents project is the only one that will break ground this year. Both the renovations to Steensland and new library collections area are set to begin next year.

Currently, the College cannot ensure the safekeeping of its rare books and archives due to an outdated air handling system. This has necessitated the replacement of the current system, alongside the renovation of 12,000 square feet of existing library space for a “climate-controlled vault and support space for the College’s rare book collections,” according to the project summary. $4 million has been set aside for this project, split evenly between the two years the project will take to complete.

Different than the Regents and Rolvaag renovations, which are both two-year projects, the Steensland renovation is set to be completed entirely next year.

marand1@stolaf.edu

Categories: Colleges

Faculty Approve GE Reform

Manitou Messenger - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 9:33pm

OLE Core now goes to Board of Regents for discussion

The final draft of the new General Education (GE) curriculum passed an all-faculty vote on Thursday, Nov. 7. Over three-quarters of the faculty present voted in favor of the new GE curriculum, OLE Core. The curriculum was amended at the Nov. 7 faculty meeting to include an Active Body requirement and allow double-counting of GEs for classes in course sequences.

Prior to the faculty vote, the Board of Regents had expressed support for the new curriculum. They will review it during their February meeting and are expected to express their support, said Jon Naito, department chair of English and member of the GE Task Force.

The GE Task Force has been working on the new curriculum for over three years, spearheaded by student representatives Ulises Jovel ’20 and Myrtó Neamonitaki ’20 and various faculty members. The Task Force’s work represents the first major motion to update the GE curriculum in about 25 years.

“Finally, the hard work that we’ve [past and present members] been doing has paid off,” Neamonitaki said. “It has shown that in the end there are people who want the system to change and who will fight to see their students happier and represented.”

The OLE Core works to amend a number of problems identified through forums between students, faculty and administrators over the 2017-18 academic year. Through these forums, the GE Task Force found that the current GE curriculum was “not as equitable or inclusive” as the mission of the College requires, according to a May 2018 Task Force report.

The GE Task Force also aims to make the curriculum smaller and more flexible, according to a May 2019 presentation to the Board of Regents. The final draft of the GE curriculum cut the maximum number of courses needed to complete the curriculum from 26 to 16.
However, faculty voted with a 72 percent approval to add a wellness requirement, which would add another GE to OLE Core.

The Active Body requirement would provide a more holistic, body-based learning experience than the former Studies in Physical Movement (SPM) requirement. The GE Task Force initially chose not to include the SPM in the OLE Core due to the ableist nature of the courses offered, Neamonitaki said.

The authors of the Active Body requirement hope to develop additional courses with inclusivity and accessibility in mind – they acknowledge in the amendment how the word “active” could be exclusive and are open to alternative language.

“The Active Body requirement isn’t a renaming of the current SPM requirement, but a re-envisioning of experiencing and learning using the body in motion as the primary mode of inquiry,” said Heather Klopchin, department chair of dance and co-author of the amendment.

The Integrative Coursework amendment passed with a 69 percent majority vote. The new amendment allows double-counting for classes in course sequences like the conversation programs. In previous drafts of OLE Core, double-counting was not allowed for these courses as part of the Task Force’s goal to discourage the “check-list” mentality.
The amendment recognizes that learning goals are not always accomplished in a single course, but rather through a collection of courses.

“It often happens that multiple requirements are conferred administratively in the last course – not because the course in isolation contains all the learning, but because it represents the culmination of several streams of learning,” the Integrative Coursework resolution reads. “The new OLE Core should allow for the recognition of such integrations.”

“Finally, the hard work that we’ve [past and present members] been doing has paid off. It has shown that in the end there are people who want the system to change and who will fight to see their students happier and represented.”
– Myrtó Neamonitaki ’20

The new amendment will allow sequenced courses to carry more than two GEs in a single class similar to the current process.

Neamonitaki said she is proud of the work the Task Force has done so far and is “excited and hopeful” to see how implementation will support progress towards a more inclusive curriculum.

The OLE Core curriculum will take effect in fall 2021 for first-year students. Second-year and upperclass students will continue to operate under the current system, while some classes will cater to both the new and old curriculums. Due to a sunset provision included in the final draft, the new curriculum will remain in effect no longer than ten years.

bermel1@stolaf.edu

favaro1@stolaf.edu

Categories: Colleges

The Weekly List – Story Songs

KYMN Radio - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 7:00pm

This week, commemorating the anniversary of the Edmund Fitzgerald tragedy, Rich offers up a list of his favorite story songs.

The post The Weekly List – Story Songs appeared first on KYMN Radio · Northfield, MN · AM 1080 & FM 95.1.

Profitable Farming Practices That Protect Drinking Water

KYMN Radio - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 3:41pm

From CRWP Kevin Stauss: Summary: One challenge facing cities in Minnesota is how to keep their drinking water safe from nitrate contamination. That’s why the Cannon River Watershed Partnership, Rice SWCD, Minnesota Extension, and the City of Faribault are working together to help farmers implement farming practices that protect both drinking water and the farmer’s

The post Profitable Farming Practices That Protect Drinking Water appeared first on KYMN Radio · Northfield, MN · AM 1080 & FM 95.1.

Important Property Tax Homestead Notice from Rice County

KYMN Radio - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 3:35pm

Posted on: November 14, 2019 Have you purchased or moved into a property in the past year? Contact your county assessor to file a homestead application if you or a qualifying relative occupy the property as a homestead on or before December 1, 2019. What is a qualifying relative? For agricultural property, a qualifying relative

The post Important Property Tax Homestead Notice from Rice County appeared first on KYMN Radio · Northfield, MN · AM 1080 & FM 95.1.

Faculty approve General Education reform

Manitou Messenger - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 12:50pm

The final draft of the new General Education (GE) curriculum passed an all-faculty vote on Thursday, Nov. 7. Over three-quarters of the faculty present voted in favor of the new GE curriculum, OLE Core. The curriculum was amended at the Nov. 7 faculty meeting to include an Active Body requirement and allow double-counting of GEs for classes in course sequences.

Prior to the faculty vote, the Board of Regents had expressed support for the new curriculum. They will review it during their February meeting and are expected to express their support, said Jon Naito, department chair of English and member of the GE Task Force.

The GE Task Force has been working on the new curriculum for over three years, spearheaded by student representatives Ulises Jovel ’20 and Myrtó Neamonitaki ’20 and various faculty members. The Task Force’s work represents the first major motion to update the GE curriculum in about 25 years.

“Finally, the hard work that we’ve [past and present members] been doing has paid off,” Neamonitaki said. “It has shown that in the end there are people who want the system to change and who will fight to see their students happier and represented.”

The OLE Core works to amend a number of problems identified through forum between students, faculty and administrators over the 2017-18 academic year. Through these forums, the GE Task Force found that the current GE curriculum was “not as equitable or inclusive” as the mission of the College requires, according to a May 2018 Task Force report.

The GE Task Force also aims to make the curriculum smaller and more flexible, according to a May 2019 presentation to the Board of Regents. The final draft of the GE curriculum cut the maximum number of courses needed to complete the curriculum from 26 to 16.

However, faculty voted with a 72 percent approval to add a wellness requirement, which would add another GE to OLE Core.

The Active Body requirement would provide a more holistic, body-based learning experience than the former Studies in Physical Movement (SPM) requirement. The GE Task Force initially chose not to include the SPM in the OLE Core due to the ableist nature of the courses offered, Neamonitaki said.

The authors of the Active Body requirement hope to develop additional courses with inclusivity and accessibility in mind – they acknowledge in the amendment how the word “active” could be exclusive and are open to alternative language.

“The Active Body requirement isn’t a renaming of the current SPM requirement, but a re-envisioning of experiencing and learning using the body in motion as the primary mode of inquiry,” said Heather Klopchin, department chair of dance and co-author of the amendment.

The Integrative Coursework amendment passed with a 69 percent majority vote. The new amendment allows double counting for classes in course sequences like the conversation programs. In previous drafts of OLE Core, double-counting was not allowed for these courses as part of the Task Force’s goal to discourage the “check-list” mentality.

The amendment recognizes that learning goals are not always accomplished in a single course, but rather through a collection of courses.

“It often happens that multiple requirements are conferred administratively in the last course – not because the course in isolation contains all the learning, but because it represents the culmination of several streams of learning,” the Integrative Coursework resolution reads. “The new OLE Core should allow for the recognition of such integrations.”

The new amendment will allow sequenced courses to carry more than two GEs in a single class similar to the current process.

“Finally, the hard work that we’ve [past and present members] been doing has paid off. It has shown that in the end there are people who want the system to change and who will fight to see their students happier and represented.”
– Myrtó Neamonitaki ’20

Neamonitaki said she is proud of the work the Task Force has done so far and is “excited and hopeful” to see how implementation will support progress towards a more inclusive curriculum.

The OLE Core curriculum will take effect in fall 2021 for first-year students. Second-year and upperclass students will continue to operate under the current system, while some classes will cater to both the new and old curriculums. Due to a sunset provision included in the final draft, the new curriculum will remain in effect no longer than ten years.

 

bermel1@stolaf.edu
favaro1@stolaf.edu

Categories: Colleges

Native plants, art, lights and more for roundabout; Cannon Valley Makers get OK from Dundas; Hillmann reports on school enrollment options

KYMN Radio - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 12:02pm

By Teri Knight, News Director With a roundabout at Highway 246 and Jefferson Parkway all but built, the Northfield council discussed landscaping and plantings around the intersection. SEH Landscape Architect Karl Weissenborn said their intent is to use native upland prairie grasses and wildflowers and small groupings of native understory and overstory trees. Additional features proposed include

The post Native plants, art, lights and more for roundabout; Cannon Valley Makers get OK from Dundas; Hillmann reports on school enrollment options appeared first on KYMN Radio · Northfield, MN · AM 1080 & FM 95.1.

PJM’s 3Q State of the Market

Carol Overland - Legalectric - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 11:43am

Here ’tis:

2019 Q3-State of the Market-PJMDownload

And dig this, from Introduction, p. 3, seems PJM is attempting to manipulate the market, and that’s not flying with Market Analytics, the entity that does the State of the Market reports:

… and this, also p. 3, decreasing revenues is putting it mildly:

This report bears reading, I know, in spare time, but this is REAL NEWS!

Categories: Citizens

Environmental Quality Commission Meeting

City of Northfield Calendar - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 10:03am
Event date: November 20, 2019
Event Time: 07:00 PM - 09:00 PM
Location:
801 Washington Street
Northfield, MN 55057

Urbanists tweet about the roundabout

Betsey Buckheit - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 9:55am
Last week, the Strib ran an article about Northfield’s planned roundabout with tunnels for people biking and walking: Twitter responds As a result, one local urbanist (streets.mn founder, active with Strong Towns, Planning Commissioner, and good guy) tweets: In turn, famous walkability guy Jeff Speck chimes in: After a bit of back and forth, the …
Categories: Citizens

Charter Commission Meeting

City of Northfield Calendar - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 9:49am
Event date: November 21, 2019
Event Time: 06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
Location:
801 WASHINGTON STREET
NORTHFIELD, MN 55057

John Fossum

KYMN Radio - Thu, 11/14/2019 - 9:36am

Rice County Attorney John Fossum talks about an incident in which a Rice County deputy has been charged with assault in the Rice County jail, the impact of new laws such as the hands-free law on the legal system, and a success story for a graduate of the Drug Treatment Court.

The post John Fossum appeared first on KYMN Radio · Northfield, MN · AM 1080 & FM 95.1.

Tamarack copper-nickel exploration?

Carol Overland - Legalectric - Wed, 11/13/2019 - 9:52pm

Talon Nickel USA has filed with the DNR to rebore/reuse existing exploratory borings, from 2015, near Tamarack, MN.

Exploration Plan – Talon 11-6-19 SubmissionDownload

But it looks like they’re hanging their hat, and a lot more, on this project. A recent press release:

Talon Metals Update: Strategic Importance of the Tamarack High Grade Nickel-Copper-Cobalt Project to the Future of Transportation in the U.S.A.

And an even more recent press release, within the last week:

Talon Metals – Advancing the Tamarack Project: Upcoming Work Program and Initiative to Evaluate Producing Nickel Sulphates for the Battery Market

Here’s a presentation touting this project:

“Securing 21 [st] Century U.S. Supply Chains for EVs and Energy Storage”

A friend lives nearby, we were closer than I thought, and this is on a County Road just north of the planned mine:

Categories: Citizens

$5 million gift enables more students to receive Carleton education

Northfield News - Wed, 11/13/2019 - 4:14pm
A $5 million gift from David Ignat ’63 and Eleanor Ignat will help make a Carleton education possible for first-generation and low-income students while challenging other donors to follow suit.
Categories: Local News
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