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HRA Meeting

City of Northfield Calendar - Tue, 01/15/2019 - 9:05am
Event date: January 22, 2019
Event Time: 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM
Location:
801 Washington Street
Northfield, MN 55057

Premier Bank Robbed!

KYMN Radio - Tue, 01/15/2019 - 1:10am

Northfield Police and the F.B.I  are on the lookout for 2 African American males who allegedly entered Premier Bank in downtown Northfield armed with weapons and proceeded to rob it shortly before noon on Tuesday, January 15.  No injuries are reported.  Police are asking for your help to identify either the individuals or the car

The post Premier Bank Robbed! appeared first on KYMN Radio · Northfield, MN · AM 1080 & FM 95.1.

A great day at the St. Croix

Blowing and Drifting - Christopher Tassava - Mon, 01/14/2019 - 10:33pm

Well, the St. Croix 40 Winter Ultra did not disappoint. I had a great race, and highly recommend the event to anyone interested in trying a short, straightforward winter race.

A new event on the calendar, the St. Croix was carefully developed by race directors Jamison and Lisa Swift as an introduction to winter ultra racing. The distance – 40 miles, entirely within St. Croix State Park about 90 minutes south of Duluth – is as short as you’ll find for a winter ultra, especially on a bike, but Jamison and Lisa made a few tweaks to raise the stakes a little.

First, all racers – 36 bikers, 42 runners, and 2 skiers – were required to carry the usual equipment for longer-distance races: winter sleeping bag, bivy sack, insulated sleeping pad, stove, pot, safety lights, etc. Overkill for a 40-miler, but good to learn to pack and carry. Second, the races started late – 6 p.m. for the runners (and the skiers), 10 p.m. for the bikers. These start times ensured that everyone would have to race in the dark. Honestly, this was the tweak that made me sign up. I love riding in the dark! Third, and most amusingly, we had to actually use our sleep system.

Ten minutes before the start of the race, we climbed into our sleeping bags and bivy sacks. When Jamison clanged the cowbell to start the race, we climbed back out, packed the gear onto our bikes, and got moving. Fourth, at the midway checkpoint (actually 22 miles into the 38-mile course), each racer had to successfully boil a potful of water – à la the Fat Pursuit. All in all, these four aspects of the race seemed to serve as good tests for everyone, whether more or less experienced with winter ultra racing. I certainly enjoyed the silly seriousness of setting up my sleep system, lying quietly in it for 10 minutes, and then packing it up and tearing off down the course with about three dozen other riders.

And tear off we did. A couple guys were quicker off the start, but I caught them within a minute or two. I had to slow down for a deer that ran onto the course ahead of me and then took its time looking for a way off the trail, which helped two other guys pass me. I hung on their wheels for a few minutes, but by about mile three they were pulling away, taking full advantage of the wide, hard trail – for all but a few miles of the course, highly compacted snow over grass paths, gravel roads, and even a few stretches of pavement.

At the first fork in the trail, they went left and then stopped. This was far early for food or drink, so I wondered if one of them was having a mechanical or a flat. When I pulled up, they were debating whether the course went to the left or to the right at the fork. We studied our paper maps (which had somehow shrunk and blurred since we’d gotten them at the race HQ meeting!), decided that left had been the correct direction, and took off again.

Within a few minutes, the yellow bubbles of their headlamp lights had shrunk to baseballs ahead of me. Just after they finally disappeared around a bend, they stopped again, in the middle of another intersection, grousing now that we’d hit two intersections with no visible directional markers. One guy checked a big permanent map posted on a sign at the junction and saw that we had in fact gone the wrong way. Now, he said, we needed to go right for a couple miles to rejoin the course. Off we went. Within a half mile, having gapped me again, they blasted through an intersection and started up a steady climb. I slowed to see if there were any directional markers at this turn, and sure enough, found two course markers. I shouted for them, but they didn’t hear me. Shrug. I turned left and headed down the trail, soon encountering several more markers that confirmed I was on the course.

I knew they’d find the course soon and start chasing me, so I mashed my pedals for a good half hour, trying to get as much space as possible. I hoped to be the first biker to the checkpoint at mile 22, which would be enough of a victory for me. This seemed somehow possible. My legs and lungs told me that I was working hard but not too hard, and my GPS unit showed speeds upwards of 12 mph – ridiculously fast for me. In less than an hour, I had covered 10 miles, putting me on pace for a four-hour finish, my stretch goal.

At almost exactly 11 p.m., I started encountering runners, who’d by then been racing for five hours. Every few minutes for the next hour, I passed one or two or three. The trail here was a little tighter, so we had to do some silent negotiating. The runner felt my lights and edged to one side of the trail, letting me go to the other (often not even needing to tap my brakes). We traded encouragements (I love the way runners clack their hiking poles together to urge you on!), and then we left each other alone in the dark again. I even saw the two skiers who were tackling the course, two women who are the baddest of the ultra-distance badasses. I loved these little blips of sociability, so much like the second half of the Tuscobia, another race where the runners start well ahead of the riders. Thanks to the endless twists and turns of the St. Croix course, the runners appeared and disappeared in seconds, rather than hanging out for minutes ahead or behind me.

The twists and turns also meant that I would not see any riders coming up on me until they were right on my back wheel. I tried to resist the urge to glance back, but every now and then I did. I saw nothing but the yellow glow of my headlamp on the trees. Empty snowy woods always feel welcoming, but they have rarely comforted me more than they when, over and over, I did not see my chasers among the trees. I felt surprisingly good, and really only had to work hard at relaxing. Deep breaths. Looser grips on the handlebars. Longer drags of nutrition drink. I told myself that they would catch me sooner or later, and that when they did, I’d stick with them as long as possible, then conserve energy for a late push to the line. Maybe they’d be tired from the chase.

Jamison and Lisa had alerted us to a couple trickier sections of trail, and just as I started anticipating the checkpoint (at this speed, having gone this far, I should reach it at this time…), I hit the first of them, a narrow footpath that the runners had really beaten up. Doing some real fatbiking over the rough snow, I decided that if the trail stayed this bad (good), or got worse (better), I’d stop and let some pressure out of my tires. Maybe take a photo of the trail too, for memory’s sake. Within a couple minutes, though, I popped off the path and back onto the main trail. I had hardly started cranking again when I hit the second section that the race directors had warned about: a paved road now covered in a evil layer of glare ice. Here and there, I found a few yards of gravel or leaves to ride, but for what must have been a mile, I crept carefully over the ice, wishing I had studs on my back tire too. I resisted the urge to push a little harder, choosing a slower pace over a crash – and either injuring myself or losing time to the chasers. Or getting caught while I was flat on my back on the ice. They had to be close by now!

Coming off this icy stretch and back onto snowy trail, my hands were cold and numb from white-knuckling my grips. Fortunately the course passed through some open country – oak savannah like the Carleton Arboretum – where I could steer with one hand and shake the other hand awake. Even better, my GPS showed that I was just a few miles from the checkpoint. I was going to make it at least that far in the lead. I didn’t want to rest at the CP, but I was eager for a few minutes off the bike.

I wove around a few more runners and hit the checkpoint at 11:51 p.m. My friend Bill, volunteering at this race, guided me to an open spot where I could lay down the Blue Buffalo and do the boil test. I felt a little like an octopus doing eight things at once: stick my gloves in the straps of my sleeping bag so I wouldn’t lose them, dig out my stove and fuel and cup and matches, find that Red Bull and an energy gel, set up the stove and light it, fill the cup with snow, open and guzzle the Red Bull, slurp down the gel, put new batteries in my headlamp, check on the water (simmering but not boiling), have another drink, stow the dead batteries and the empty Red Bull can, show the boiling water to Bill, turn off the stove and stick it in the snow to cool, stow the fuel and matches, pour out the hot water and stick the cup in the snow to cool, stow the stove, stow the cup, zip everything up, put my helmet on my head…

As I finished, Bill looked back down the trail. “Looks like a couple bikers coming in!” This was fine. I was going to be gone for ten minutes before even if their boil tests went well. If they caught me before the finish, fine. I pulled my gloves back on. “Oh, nope, I’m wrong. Two runners. No bikers yet!” Really?

Excited, I thanked him for volunteering, hopped on the bike, and headed up the trail at 12:04 a.m. 13 minutes at the checkpoint, and now 16 miles to go. 90 minutes or so – less if the trail was super fast and I didn’t bonk, a bit more if the trail was slower or I just started losing it. The first stretch after the checkpoint was a wide paved road covered in hardpack snow, ideal for getting back up to speed. The effort warmed up my hands and arms, which were chilled from the checkpoint. My legs ached a little too, tired from two hours of riding and stiff from crouching in the snow. I zoomed down the only big descent on the course and grunted my way up the climb on the other side. I felt super slow going uphill for one of the only times in the race. Weak. Heavy. Those two guys I’d chased early had been so freaking strong, they’d zip up this climb no problem, taking back minutes and minutes of my gap.

A flat, a turn off the road and back onto tighter snowmobile trail, and suddenly a bigger climb, one that resembled the endless kickers in the third leg of the Arrowhead. By the top, I was gasping for air. Oh shit. I was cooked. But at the crest, I hit a Y in the trail. A directional arrow pointed right. I realized this was the couple-mile loop at the far end of the course, one that would end by sending me back down that tough incline and point me toward the finish. This then wasn’t quite the home stretch, but the approach to the home stretch. The loop was rough, a mental challenge after the zoned-out speed riding on the road from the checkpoint. 7 mph or 10 mph was fine here, a good speed given the ragged snow – a speed I’d be happy to average in a longer race.

My compass told me that I was now pointed south, finishing the loop. Just after passing the directional sign that told me I was back on the main trail, I met two riders coming toward me, about to start the loop. I couldn’t tell if they were the guys I’d last seen early on, but if these two weren’t those two, those two guys must be even closer behind, somewhere on the loop. We cheered each other on, and then they were gone.

I plummeted down the hill I’d struggled up twenty minutes before, downed one last gel to stave off any bonk in the next few miles, and settled in for a push to the finish – six, seven miles. Back and forth and back and forth to work. A half hour. I could go fast for a half hour, I hoped.

Now my legs really hurt, though. Not just my quads and hamstrings, but my knees, from mashing a big gear for hours and hours. Thank goodness the Blue Buffalo had functioned flawlessly the whole night, but jeez sometimes riding bikes hurts. Trying to use different muscles, I stood, crouched, leaned forward… My mouth dried out. I took a hit of drink, but it made my mouth and throat tingle in a pukey way. I would have been embarrassed to get passed after crashing on the ice earlier, but I would have been much more embarrassed to get passed while throwing up in the snow. Plus Jamison had warned us to leave no trace!

Take a few deep breaths, sit back and sit up. A couple solid burps cleared the digestive system. The trail here cut between forest to the left and prairie to the right, and the thinner trees let me see a couple sets of blinking lights ahead. I passed another runner, a guy who really running, unlike almost everyone else I’d seen. Almost immediately I saw another runner ahead and figured that this guy had seen the other’s lights and was trying to close the gap. In a minute I was up to and then past the chasee. A yellow glow in the distance resolved into lights around buildings. Maybe the race HQ and the finish? No, I had at least a couple miles to go. Probably one of the many campgrounds in the park, like one I’d seen on the icy road.

Another fork in the trail. Almost too late I saw a directional sign, hit my brakes, and skidded from the far side of the left fork across the trail and onto the right fork. A “Race HQ” sign glowed on the side of the trail, and I could see the brighter lights through the trees – not just lights, but the reflective cones set up in the finishing chute. I had to look back to see if my chasers were there, but nope: nothing but the dim glow of the runner I’d just passed.

No freaking way. I was about to finish first. Without thinking I put my hands on my head, dumbfounded, then had to grab the bars and wheel through a tight corner and up the finishing chute. Should I raise my hands? Wheelie? Pump my fists?

Instead of all those alternatives, I rolled across the finish line and crashed into the snow, legs seized in a wonderfully satisfying way.

Immediately, Jamison and a couple other volunteers came over. I laughed at how ludicrous it was to have crossed the line first, but then tried to explain to Jamison about the wrong turns. He listened, nodded, and said he’d check my online tracker to see how much of the course I’d missed. Within a few minutes, he came back to say that given the course-marking problems and the fact that others had also taken wrong turns, I really would receive first place, in a time of 3:25 – as Jamison said with tongue in cheek, the new course record! Second and third finished together 11 minutes later, telling me how they’d taken a couple more wrong turns after I had found the course. Nobody seemed too annoyed by any of it; racing is racing. Later I saw that they had reached the checkpoint just four minutes after I left it, and left it sixteen minutes after I had. They had been closing the gap, but I had gone fast enough to save some of it!

If I never finish first again (and honestly, I probably won’t!), I’ll relish the experience of winning this one. And even if I had not gotten lucky, I would have enjoyed the race. Jamison and Lisa put on an excellent event that should only get better in the second year. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in trying an overnight winter race.

Categories: Citizens

Lonsdale's single-family housing booms while others in Rice County hold steady

Northfield News - Mon, 01/14/2019 - 6:45pm
Single-family home construction throughout Rice County stayed pretty much on par in 2018, except for in the city of Lonsdale, where the number of homes increased by nearly 29 percent.
Categories: Local News

Photographer converts home studio to part wig shop

Northfield News - Mon, 01/14/2019 - 4:30pm
Picture this: a home with wigs in it, where a woman dealing with hair loss or just interested in an easy new style can get individualized assistance. No aisles of different looks. No searching for help. No judgment.
Categories: Local News

Valdecantos' poems engraved in two hometowns: Northfield and Madrid

Northfield News - Mon, 01/14/2019 - 4:27pm
Born in Madrid, but now living in Northfield, Mar Valdecantos can claim to literally be engraved in two towns.
Categories: Local News

Kidnapping suspect targeted girl after seeing her get on bus

Northfield News - Mon, 01/14/2019 - 4:19pm
BARRON, Wis. (AP) — A Wisconsin man accused of abducting 13-year-old Jayme Closs and holding her captive for three months made up his mind to take her when he spotted the teenager getting on a school bus, authorities said Monday.
Categories: Local News

Northfield Downtown Development Corp. executive director resigns

Northfield News - Mon, 01/14/2019 - 2:47pm
The Northfield Downtown Development Corp. announced Monday that Executive Director Jenni Roney has resigned, effective Jan. 24.
Categories: Local News

Economic Development Authority Meeting

City of Northfield Calendar - Mon, 01/14/2019 - 1:46pm
Event date: January 24, 2019
Event Time: 07:30 AM - 11:59 PM
Location:
801 Washington Street
Northfield, MN 55057

Planning Commission Meeting

City of Northfield Calendar - Mon, 01/14/2019 - 1:41pm
Event date: January 17, 2019
Event Time: 07:00 PM - 11:59 PM
Location:
801 Washington Street
Northfield, MN 55057

Sidewalk Poetry competition enters ninth year, accepting Spanish entries

Northfield News - Mon, 01/14/2019 - 1:00pm
Northfield poets have been making their mark in the town’s sidewalks since 2011 — and this year, they’ll be able to do it in Spanish, as well.
Categories: Local News

Rice County Death Investigation, Dundas Comprehensive Plan, and more

KYMN Radio - Mon, 01/14/2019 - 12:07pm

The Rice County Sheriff’s Office is investigating a death which occurred Sunday 1/13/18 in Wheatland Township. The deceased is identified as David Amundson, age 44, of New Prague.  Media Release Updated DI-011319 (4) A bunch of tools were stolen out of a work van in the Arbor Street area of Northfield. Northfield Police Chief Monte Nelson

The post Rice County Death Investigation, Dundas Comprehensive Plan, and more appeared first on KYMN Radio · Northfield, MN · AM 1080 & FM 95.1.

Parks & Recreation Board Meeting

City of Northfield Calendar - Mon, 01/14/2019 - 11:45am
Event date: January 17, 2019
Event Time: 06:30 PM - 09:00 PM
Location:
801 Washington Street
Northfield, MN 55057

I coded from an API for the first time, and so can you!

Pegasus Librarian - Iris Jastram - Mon, 01/14/2019 - 11:35am

A couple of weeks ago, my library upped our Libguides instance to Libguides CMS, which means that a few weeks ago I came to be in charge of a system that has APIs for the first time in my life. We got the system so that we can pull more robust information from Libguides into our discovery system (so that’s our systems librarian’s domain, not mine), but there have been a couple of tiny things I’ve wanted to do that would be so much better with an API than with the built-in widgets, so I cracked my knuckles and set to learning.

Here’s the first tiny project I did, narrated so that you can do something similar if you, like me, are not an expert in web coding but have access to Libguides APIs.

Building an API-fed dropdown menu

I know, I know, there are dropdown menus of guides available in the built-in widget builder, but I don’t like how they look, and I don’t like that you need the “Go” button to make them go. So this made a perfect first toe-in-the-water project for me.

Getting data via the API

First, I needed to figure out how to make an API request. Libguides CMS “Endpoints v1.1” has a section to GET Guides, a list of “parameters,” an example request, an example return, and not much else. It took me a while to figure out that the example request didn’t work because it was asking for 2 specific guide IDs — IDs for guides that do not exist in our system. Once I deleted those two numbers I could start building requests that actually worked.

Then I figured out that you add a parameter by adding “&parameter_name=parameter_value” to that base URL. So http://lgapi-us.libapps.com/1.1/guides/?site_id=…=owner&sort_by=name would take all our guides and sort them by guide name. From there I could happily keep adding parameters, and if I wanted both “Course” and “Subject” guides but not other guides, I could put a comma between the parameter values “2” and “3” to get “&guide_types=2,3” in my request URL.

Other useful terminology I learned along the way that will help my future Googling includes:

In the end, I created an API request for published guides, sorted by name, and filtered to just those having a particular tag. Here’s an example record from the JSON output I got from that request:

Using the API-generated data to feed a dropdown menu

Then came the searching around through StackOverflow for examples of code that uses a URL to point to JSON-formatted information, examples of code that use JSON fields to populate a dropdown menu, and examples of code that use javascript to add an “event sniffer” to a dropdown menu so that when a user selects an option, the menu opens a new URL without requiring anything else (like clicking a pesky “go” button). This step took me a while… In the end, I fiddled and fiddled with example code until all of a sudden, bits and pieces started to work! So exciting! And little by little I arrived at code that works for me.

Here’s an annotated version of what I built (and an html document you can download and mess with).

(And if you are someone who actually knows what they’re doing, and you see that I made dumb mistakes/choices, please let me know! I’m eager to learn.)

Categories: Citizens

Senator Rich Draheim

KYMN Radio - Mon, 01/14/2019 - 9:29am

Senator Rich Draheim provides his weekly update on the Legislative Session currently underway, talks about his health care bill, and more. Sen Rich Draheim 1-14-19

The post Senator Rich Draheim appeared first on KYMN Radio · Northfield, MN · AM 1080 & FM 95.1.

Deceased Man found in Wheatland Township – Update

KYMN Radio - Mon, 01/14/2019 - 9:21am

A deceased male was found in Wheatland Township.  See press release below from Rice County Sheriff Troy Dunn.  UPDATE: The victim has been identified as David Amundson, age 44, of New Prague. Media Release DI-011319

The post Deceased Man found in Wheatland Township – Update appeared first on KYMN Radio · Northfield, MN · AM 1080 & FM 95.1.

St. Olaf names director of new Taylor Center for Equity and Inclusion

St. Olaf College - Mon, 01/14/2019 - 8:08am
Dr. María C. Pabón Gautier has been named the director of the new Glenn and Myretta Taylor Center for Equity and Inclusion.
Categories: Colleges

Nuevos equipos de gobierno local y estatal en Minnesota

KYMN Radio - Sun, 01/13/2019 - 9:12pm

Semana de cambios en el gobierno local y estatal con esperanza de un mejor futuro para todos. Y sigan los muchos eventos en la ciudad en este mes de enero.El Super Barrio 1 13 19

The post Nuevos equipos de gobierno local y estatal en Minnesota appeared first on KYMN Radio · Northfield, MN · AM 1080 & FM 95.1.

Police identify man found dead in field

Northfield News - Sun, 01/13/2019 - 2:29pm
Rice County Sheriff's deputies are investigating what caused the death of a man found Sunday morning north of Lonsdale.
Categories: Local News
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