Renowned Psychologist Joy DeGruy, Author of ‘Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome,’ to Present Carleton Convocation

Dr. Joy DeGruy

Renowned educator, psychologist, and social worker Joy DeGruy, author of “Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome: America’s Legacy of Enduring Injury and Healing,” will present the Carleton College weekly convocation on Friday, Feb. 7 from 10:50 to 11:50 a.m. in the Skinner Memorial Chapel. DeGruy will discuss her book, whichaddresses the residual impact of trauma on African Descendants in the Americas. This event, commemorating Black History Month, is free and open to the public. Convocations are also streamed online at go.carleton.edu/convo/.

“Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome: America’s Legacy of Enduring Injury and Healing” (Uptone Press, 2005) lays the groundwork for understanding how the past has influenced the present, and opens up the discussion of how we can eliminate non-productive attitudes, beliefs and adaptive behaviors, building upon the strengths we have gained from the past to heal injuries of today.

“While African Americans managed to emerge from chattel slavery and the oppressive decades that followed with great strength and resiliency, they did not emerge unscathed,” writes DeGruy. “Slavery produced centuries of physical, psychological and spiritual injury.”

Dr. Joy DeGruy holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Communication, a master’s degree in Social Work (MSW), a master’s degree in Clinical Psychology, and a Ph.D. in Social Work Research. Dr. Joy DeGruy is a nationally and internationally renowned researcher, educator, author and presenter. She is an Assistant Professor at Portland State University and the President of JDP Inc. Dr. DeGruy has over twenty-five years of practical experience as a professional in the field of social work. She conducts workshops and trainings in the areas of mental health, social justice and culture specific social service model development. Learn more at www.joydegruy.com.

This event is sponsored by the Carleton College Office of College Relations. For more information, including disability accommodations, call (507) 222-4308. The Skinner Memorial Chapel is located on First and College Streets in Northfield.


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