Northfield Rotary Club

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Updated: 1 hour 26 min ago

Rotary Cogwheel | 02.04.2016

Tue, 02/02/2016 - 10:28am

Today: Alan Anderson, Climate Change Threatens Rotary’s Good Work (Estenson)

Birthdays: Jean Wakely (2/3) and Vicky Langer (2/6)

Next Week: Nicole Blaires, Exchange Student (V. Dilley)

Last Week:

We need the pollinators.

Bees, butterflies, birds, moths and others that spread pollen are necessary to sustain our food supply and nurture our eco-system, says Jo Ann Sabin, a volunteer for Pollinator Friendly Alliance, a nonprofit based in Stillwater. They are responsible for two-thirds of our food production and 85 percent of a healthy eco-system.

Bees do 80 percent of the pollination. But it is not just honeybees carrying the load; other native bees also do the work. There are some 20,000 bee species worldwide, 400 in Minnesota alone.

Jo Ann says the threat to pollinators is real. They need a consistent food supply, such as pollen, nectar, and clean water, and safe haven. Their habitats have been compromised by the increased use of toxic chemicals, such insecticides and pesticides on farms and around homes.

The toxic chemicals used in farming are well-regulated, she said, but home use is not. People tend to follow the maxim that if some is good, more is better. She suggests we read the labels and follow the recommendations.

While the challenges facing pollinators are being recognized, meaningful national policy has been slow to emerge. But in Minnesota, Jo Ann said there are a number of hopeful signs. The number of cities in Minnesota that are actively working to protect pollinators exceed the total number in the other 49 states.

Things individuals can do to help in this effort are: educate ourselves and others, be judicious with our use of toxic chemicals, plant shrubs and plants that provide a healthy pollinator habitat and be a vocal champion for the pollinators in your community.

For more information, go to: http://www.pollinatorfriendly.org/.


Mini Classification:

In the interest of time, Beth Kallestad chose the “lightning round” approach to her mini-classification. She was raised in Massachusetts, served as executive director of Cannon River Watershed Partnership for several years and now has her own consulting business. If you want to know more, she would love to have coffee with you.


Guests: Dorothy Ischler (Wakely), Jesse Streitz (Laurie Williams, who thought this was “just lunch” and invited her husband), John Larson (Estenson), Dave Stanford (Stevens), new member Sharon Flaten (Caskey), Dr. Signe Wass (Lorang) and the new Paul Krause, a newly minted American citizen, (Paul Kraus).

Scholarship Enhancement:  Rich Lorang

Announcements:

The district would like us to register on its website. Here’s how you do it:

  • Find your Rotary ID number on the label of your Rotary Magazine; 2) Log on to www. Rotary.org, click “My Club,” below Rotary International click “Sign in Register,” and click “Create Account. 3) Follow the prompts to complete the questions and your Rotary profile.
  • Chris Weber reminded members that Rotary offers a Peace Fellowship for someone who wants to further their education in the area of peace and reconciliation. Five years of work-related experience is required. Our recruitment need not be limited to our club’s geographic area. Talk to Chris if you have a candidate in mind.
  • Alan Anderson and Rick Estenson collaborated on a letter to the editor about climate change that appeared in the last Rotary Magazine.
  • The Pollinator Friendly Alliance is holding a symposium in St. Paul Saturday, March 8, called “People for Pollinators.” For more information, go to: http://www.pollinatorfriendly.org/
  • State Representative Rick Hansen will talk about the “Plight of the pollinators” at Carleton College Weitz Center for the Creative Arts Monday, Feb. 15, 7 p.m. See Erica Zweifel for more information.

Here is a list of this year’s outbound students. Some have already departed.

  • Beimers, Henry – Norway
  • Beimers, William – Brazil
  • Carlson, Samuel -Argentina
  • Estrada, Gabriella – France
  • Hahn, Erin – Thailand
  • Hodel, Christoph – Indonesia
  • Kelley, Caitlin – Chile
  • Lunderby, Jack – Brazil
  • Mandsager, Erik – Zimbabwe
  • Muir, Mason – Taiwan
  • Olson, Josiah – Colombia
  • Regnier, Eli – Brazil
  • Rodriguez-Vazquez, Leslie – Brazil
  • Scheffert, Jenna – Italy
  • Seitz, Zoe – Denmark
  • Washburn Chapman, Ahna Cole – South Africa
  • Woitalla, Jessica – Brazil.


Past Northfield Rotary Club meeting videos on YouTube

Coming Up

February 18 — Jayne Hager Dee, Classification Talk (Prowe)

February 25 — Betsey Buckheit, Northfield Bike Plan (Zweifel)

March 3 — Adrian Thomas, Classification

March 10 — Carson Hsia, Exchange Student (V. Dilley)

Categories: Organizations

People For Pollinators – March 8, 2016 – 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM

Sun, 01/31/2016 - 8:40pm

People For Pollinators – March 8, 2016 – 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM
Dakota Lodge, 1200 Stassen Lane, St. Paul
Cost – $45.00

Pollinator Friendly Alliance and Pollinate Minnesota invite you to join us for an in-depth symposium designed to inspire, connect and unite for a pollinator friendly Minnesota. Learn about pollinators and their relationship to birds, wildlife and biodiversity, farm and urban habitat, pesticide and advocacy issues in a friendly and motivational environment. We welcome all who want to help pollinators including educators, farmers, gardeners, city staff, elected officials, conservationists, and community organizers. Click here to register.

Beth Kallestad is going from Northfield if anyone would like to car pool contact her at bethcrokallestad@gmail.com.

Categories: Organizations

Rotary Cogwheel | 01.28.2016

Wed, 01/27/2016 - 7:54am

Today: Jo Ann Sabin, Pollinator Friendly Alliance, (Kallestad)

Birthdays: Rotarians across the globe.

Next Week: Alan Anderson, Climate Change Threatens Rotary’s Good Work

Last Week:

What makes Katy Hargis run?

Well, for starters how about the local women’s running club that rouses her out of bed every Saturday morning, but then there are the five children (two sets of twins), a love of the outdoors, grandparenthood, and a commitment to civic affairs. Oh, and Katy is also the director of Communications and Development for HealthFinders, a local nonprofit providing medical care for uninsured and underinsured residents of Rice County. That pretty much covers it.

The oldest of five children, Katy grew up in Crystal, Minn. in a simpler time when neighborhood skating rinks, ski slopes and downtown Minneapolis were her playground. Growing up, Katy spent a lot of time at YMCA Camp Menogyn near Grand Marais. She considers it a life-changing experience. The rugged, outdoor activities introduced her to the spiritual benefits of the woods and gave her a sense of empowerment. She now serves on the camp’s board of directors.

She went to the University of Minnesota Duluth and, after three seasons working for the National Park Service, enrolled in a graduate program at Indiana State University, where she met husband, Joe.

They ultimately returned to Minnesota, when Joe took a position at Carleton College. After several years of his commuting from Minneapolis, they moved with their three children to Northfield and had two more.

When she moved to Northfield, Katy found Early Childhood Family Education classes to be a lifesaver. She’s been an active parent at Greenvale Park Elementary, St. Dominic’s, and Prairie Creek School. She eventually became involved in broader community affairs, serving on the city park board and the Northfield School Board.

She said she is grateful to be living in Northfield. It has provided support, options in education, many healthy diversions and friendships. Her avocations include running (seven marathons to her credit), hiking, biking, book club and a love of animals. She also has an enduring affection for the North Shore and Lake Superior and all of the opportunities those areas offer.

Katy and Joe are close to being empty nesters. Their second set of twins will graduate from high school this spring. They have a daughter in a nursing program at Westminister College in Salt Lake City, a son in San Diego and one in New York, and one eight-month old granddaughter.


Mini Classification:
Joe Hargis grew up in southern Indiana watching his father pound out copy for the local community newspaper. That’s where he developed his affection for community journalism and the rhythms of small-town life.

He met his wife, Katie, at Indiana State University and they moved back to Minnesota when Joe accepted a position at Carleton College. That was almost 30 years ago. Over time, he has learned to tolerate the winters and enjoy hockey.

He is now Associate Vice President of External Relations for the college. He also serves on the boards of Northfield Downtown Development Corporation and Laura Baker Services Association.

Joe said he finds Northfield a truly unique community and he is inspired by the service work of his fellow Rotarians.


Guests: Dorothy Ischler (Wakely)

Scholarship Enhancement:  Laurie Williams

Announcements:

New member orientation will be held tomorrow Friday, Jan. 29, noon at Community Resource Bank. New members from 2013-2015 are encouraged to attend. Michelle Lasswell, our vice president in charge of membership, along with other board members will provide an overview of Rotary structure, activities and ways to become involved. Lunch will be provided.

Chris Weber reported that our Literacy Committee is a full partner with other literacy initiatives in town. We are working with the Early Childhood Initiative Coalition to collect gently-used children’s books and redistribute them through businesses, the Y, apartment complexes and the Northfield Community Resource Center. We are also working with Healthy Community Initiative’s Northfield Promise to promote early reading and literacy.

Richard Maus said $12,000 was raised in support of an education initiative in Liberia. We are shipping books and other supplies to Project Blackboard, a foundation created by Wokie Daboh, one of Richard’s former students. Richard also noted that World Health Organization’s new director of Polio Eradication, Michael Zaffran, says the end of polio is in sight.

 

Here is a list of this year’s outbound students. Some have already departed.
Beimers, Henry – Norway

Beimers, William – Brazil

Carlson, Samuel -Argentina

Estrada, Gabriella – France

Hahn, Erin – Thailand

Hodel, Christoph – Indonesia

Kelley, Caitlin – Chile

Lunderby, Jack – Brazil

Mandsager, Erik – Zimbabwe

Muir, Mason – Taiwan

Olson, Josiah – Colombia

Regnier, Eli – Brazil

Rodriguez-Vazquez, Leslie – Brazil

Scheffert, Jenna – Italy

Seitz, Zoe – Denmark

Washburn Chapman, Ahna Cole – South Africa

Woitalla, Jessica – Brazil.

 


Past Northfield Rotary Club meeting videos on YouTube

Coming Up

February 11 — Nicole Blaires, Exchange Student (V. Dilley)

 

February 18 — Jayne Hager Dee, Classification Talk (Prowe)

 

February 25 — Peg Prowe, Northfield Bike Plan (Zweifel)

 

March 3 — TBA

Categories: Organizations

Rotary Cogwheel | 01.21.2016

Wed, 01/20/2016 - 10:37am

Birthdays: Mark Abbott (1/17) and Wendy Sivanich (1/21)

Next Week: Jo Ann Sabin, Pollinator Friendly Alliance, (Kallestad)

Last Week:

Northfield Area Chamber of Commerce has adopted “Good, Better, Best” as a slogan for 2016. Todd Bornhauser, executive director, explained that the organization is good, but it needs to be better so it can be its best.

The chamber had been on a rocky ride before Todd took the helm 15 months ago. He believes the organization is back on solid footing and leaning forward. Membership has grown from 190 members to 260 over the last year, and he says there are another 200 to 300 prospects in the local market.

He stressed that the chamber is a voice for all businesses in the community, not just those that line Division Street or employ large numbers. Sixty percent of chamber members employ less than 10 people, Todd said.

The chamber aspires to be the leader in shaping the local business climate. The organization’s foundational values are: 1) Provide value to members; 2) Be a respected player in community affairs; 3) Be a collaborator; 4) Provide leadership; 5) Encourage volunteerism; and 6) Have fun doing the above.

Its goals for 2016 include promoting member engagement, economic development, advocating for the business community, promoting tourism and providing education and networking opportunities for chamber members.

Todd has been a Northfield resident since 1990. He graduated from Florida State University with a degree in Hotel-Restaurant Management. He worked in the hospitality industry for 17 years before becoming the chamber executive director for Lakeville, a position he held for 14 years before assuming the position in Northfield. He is married with three children.


Mini Classification:

Tim Madigan grew up in southwestern Pennsylvania. He came to Minnesota to attend college at Minnesota State Moorhead, where he met his wife, Wendy. He was a teacher for a time, but ultimately earned a masters degree in City Management and over the rest of his career served five cities, including a four-year tour of duty as Northfield’s city administrator.

Now retired, Tim is teaching Urban Studies at Minnesota State Mankato and a course on the 1960s for the Cannon Valley Elder Collegium. When he is not teaching his is biking, skiing and enjoying two grandsons.


Guests: Sharon Flaten (Prowe), Mary Jo Christopherson (Zweifel) and Anita McKay (Allawala)

Scholarship Enhancement:  Erica Zweifel, the birthday girl

Announcements:

  • New member orientation will be held Friday, Jan. 29, noon at Community Resource Bank. New members from 2013-2015 are encouraged to attend. Michelle Lasswell, our vice president in charge of membership, along with other board members will provide an overview of Rotary structure, activities and ways to become involved. Lunch will be provided.
  • Mark Abbott was recognized for a Paul Harris Plus 5 Fellowship. David Brown reminded us that we strive to have every member contribute $100 or more to the foundation each year. The foundation contributes to Polio Plus and many more projects across the globe.
  • Charlie Cogan noted the recent suicide attack in Pakistan that targeted Polio Plus workers. In spite of these attacks, he said, the vaccination programs continue.
  • Boxes for recycling cell phone are now available at our meetings. The phones are being collected by the Minnesota Zoo and used to fund its Recycle the Rain Forest project.

Here is a list of this year’s outbound students. Some have already departed.

  • Beimers, Henry – Norway
  • Beimers, William – Brazil
  • Carlson, Samuel -Argentina
  • Estrada, Gabriella – France
  • Hahn, Erin – Thailand
  • Hodel, Christoph – Indonesia
  • Kelley, Caitlin – Chile
  • Lunderby, Jack – Brazil
  • Mandsager, Erik – Zimbabwe
  • Muir, Mason – Taiwan
  • Olson, Josiah – Colombia
  • Regnier, Eli – Brazil
  • Rodriguez-Vazquez, Leslie – Brazil
  • Scheffert, Jenna – Italy
  • Seitz, Zoe – Denmark
  • Washburn Chapman, Ahna Cole – South Africa
  • Woitalla, Jessica – Brazil


Past Northfield Rotary Club meeting videos on YouTube

Coming Up

February 4 — Alan Anderson, Climate Change Threatens Rotary’s Good Work

February 11 — Nicole Blaires, Exchange Student (V. Dilley)

February 18 — Jayne Hager Dee, Classification Talk (Prowe)

Categories: Organizations

Rotary Cogwheel | 01.14.2016

Wed, 01/20/2016 - 10:35am

Today: Todd Bornhauser, Northfield Area Chamber of Commerce (Madigan)

Birthdays: Ragh Singh (1/10), Lynne Pederson (1/11), Erica Zweifel (1/14) and Rick Esse (1/16).

Next Week: Katie Hargis, Classification, (Joe Hargis)

Last Week:

“The greatest legend that America ever forgot” is how author Terry Kerber thinks of  Major Taylor, the subject of the book he co-wrote with his brother, Conrad.

Major Taylor was the most celebrated athlete of his time and dominated the world of competitive cycling from 1896 to 1910. He set numerous world records and won 117 of his 168 races. Over an eight-year period when he was at the peak of his career, he was the highest paid athlete in the world.

But despite his success and celebrity status, his story — dramatic and inspiring — remained untold until the Kerber brothers, partners in a retirement investment advisory firm, decided to write their book.

Competitive cycling was the NFL of its time. In the dawn of the 20th century, this dangerous and sometimes deadly sport captivated the imagination of the masses, worldwide, drawing huge crowds, sometimes as many as 50,000, to see men on bikes compete in one, two and five-mile races on a hardwood track.

Marshall Taylor, his given name, was an African-American from Indianapolis who had a gift. Overt racism prevented him from capitalizing on his talent until mentors and sports promoters helped him gain access to the sport and an opportunity to prove himself on the track.

He was most comfortable racing in Europe and Australia where he felt liberated from the bigotry he faced at home. His deep commitment to his faith meant he observed the Sabbath and refused to race on a Sunday, which greatly frustrated cycling promoters.

Major Taylor made the equivalent of millions of dollars during his career and lost it all to bad investments. He died a pauper, but his legacy survives in the form of Major Taylor cycling clubs that exist across the nation.


Mini Classification:

Elizabeth Child shared her “three things” profile with us. They include:

  • Three names she has answered to: Libby, Lizard and Elizabeth;
  • Three places she’s lived: London, Boston and St. Petersburg, Fla.;
  • Three places she’s worked: Dudley Riggs Espresso, a flower shop in Boston and The Reader;
  • Three things she enjoys watching: Palobolus Dance Company, The Voice and her cats bathing;
  • Three things she is looking forward to: scuba diving in the British Virgin Isles, making or exceeding the United Way campaign goal, and hearing Terry Kerber talk about his book “Major Taylor.”


Guests: Bruce Dybvik (Briske), Barbara Johnson (Lasswell) and Dave Stanford (Tiano)

Scholarship Enhancement:  Carson

Announcements:

  • Northfield Y’s Rotary challenge netted an amazing $75,000 for the Y’s latest capital campaign. The club contributed $5,000, the American Center for Philanthropy $10,000 and Rotary members individually did the rest. That good work will earn us more recognition at the Y and our inbound exchange students will have free membership for the next five years. The Y is raising $1 million to pay down outstanding debt.
  • Treasurer David Wolf reminded members that invoices are now being sent electronically. If you do not remember receiving one, see David to make sure he has your correct e-mail.
  • David Brown said your quarterly payment is a good time to add to the Every Rotarian Every Year $100 donation to the Paul Harris Foundation. With a contribution of $1,000 you will receive a Paul Harris Fellowship.
  • Charlie is still selling Polio Plus ties. A $200 donation will earn you a tie similar to the one Bill Gates wore when he announced his foundation’s commitment to eradicating polio and the satisfaction of knowing with the Gates Foundation match it will vaccinate 1,000 children.
  • Boxes for recycling cell phone are now available at our meetings. The phones are being collected by the Minnesota Zoo and used to fund its Recycle the Rain Forest project.

 Here is a list of this year’s outbound students. Some have already departed.

  • Beimers, Henry – Norway
  • Beimers, William – Brazil
  • Carlson, Samuel -Argentina
  • Estrada, Gabriella – France
  • Hahn, Erin – Thailand
  • Hodel, Christoph – Indonesia
  • Kelley, Caitlin – Chile
  • Lunderby, Jack – Brazil
  • Mandsager, Erik – Zimbabwe
  • Muir, Mason – Taiwan
  • Olson, Josiah – Colombia
  • Regnier, Eli – Brazil
  • Rodriguez-Vazquez, Leslie – Brazil
  • Scheffert, Jenna – Italy
  • Seitz, Zoe – Denmark
  • Washburn Chapman, Ahna Cole – South Africa
  • Woitalla, Jessica – Brazil.


Past Northfield Rotary Club meeting videos on YouTube

Coming Up

January 28 — Jo Ann Sabin, Pollinator Friendly Alliance, (Kallestad)

February 4 — Alan Anderson, Climate Change Threatens Rotary’s Good Work

February 11 — Nicole Blaires, Exchange Student (V. Dilley)

February 18 — Jayne Hager Dee, Classification Talk (Prowe)

 

Categories: Organizations

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