Northfield Rotary Club

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Updated: 41 min 52 sec ago

Rotary Cogwheel | 11.20.2014

Tue, 11/18/2014 - 1:37pm

Today: Stacey Zell, Northfield Hospital Sleep Center (Schlichting)

Birthdays: Carl Caskey (11/14), Matthew Rich and Jim Prichard (11/17), Teresa Jensen (11/19), and Adam Elling (11/20)

Next Week: TURKEY TROT!

Last Week:
 Speaking of trivia, did you know there are four species of Invasive Carp, but only one of them jumps?

That’s right. Nick Frohnaur of Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Water Resources, said Grass Carp, Bighead Carp, Black Carp and Silver Carp are all considered invasive species. It is the Silver Carp that has gained notoriety through YouTube videos, popping spasmodically out of the water and sometimes assaulting recreational boaters. These carp can weigh up to 60 pounds, and they pack a wallop. Nick said some have been known to break jaws and knock boaters silly.

These carp are large, plankton-feeding fish, first introduced to the southern United States in the 1970s to clean up the region’s aquaculture. They have done their job, but some have escaped and made their way north. The Illinois River is now home to the world’s largest Silver Carp population, and they are making their way up the Mississippi River. While no breeding populations have been detected in Minnesota waters, individual fish have been caught near the Twin Cities and in the St. Croix River.

Nick is the coordinator of the campaign to keep these fish out of Minnesota waterways. They’ve had an action plan in place since 2011 that focuses on early detection, prevention, mitigation and control and outreach and communication.

The carp’s impact on the economy is unknown as yet, but the risks, beyond the nuisance factor, are being assessed. Nick said there is concern thant the Minnesota River is a favorable habitat for Silver Carp.

In June of next year, some of the lock and dams will be closed to create a barrier for the fish. The State Legislature is also considering an allocation for construction of a fish barrier for the Coon Rapids dam. These measures are designed to buy time until more permanent solutions are found.

Nick said vigilance by boaters and anglers is always an issue. They can aid the carp invasion if they are not careful about cleaning boats and equipment and don’t use best practices with disposal of live bait.


Mini-Classification

Alan Anderson was born and raised in Owatonna. He graduated from Gustavus Adolphus College and went on to get a Wildlife Science degree from Oregon State University. After a stint running a small family business, he embarked on a 35-year career as an administrator with the Boy Scouts of America. He retired 18 months ago.

He and his wife have been Northfield residents for 11 years. They have a daughter who lives in Lutsen, a son who lives in Apple Valley, and three granddaughters.


Guests: Lydia, Giulia, Marcelo and Philipy (Rich), Paul Krause, our newest member, (Sinning), Mark Moelke (Yogi) Charlie Duarte (Halverson) and Wade Thommen (Holden).

Scholarship Enhancement: Philipy, who will no doubt invest in a fleece-lined sweatshirt.

First Job: Jacob Conway did everything but play the leading man in his first job at a Cottage Grove movie theater. He was a jack of all trades, running the concession stand, selling tickets and cleaning up the theaters for $7.25 an hour. He says he might still be there if the theater hadn’t tanked.

Announcements:

— Rob Bierman said our online “early bird” registration for the Turkey Trot is up to 500 runners. All systems are go. If you are going to be in town that morning and not running the race, you are invited to sign up to be a registrar or a course monitor.

— Community Resource Bank is hosting an American Red Cross blood drive Wednesday, Nov. 26, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. To register go to www.redcrossblood.org or call 507-645-4441.

Past Northfield Rotary Club meeting videos on Youtube: NorthfieldRotaryClubVideos

Coming Up:


Nov. 27 — TURKEY TROT
Dec. 4 — District Governor DG Karel (Cogan)
Dec. 11 — President Matthew Rich
Dec. 18 — Kevin Born and Naomi Mortenson, Environmental Tillage Systems (Lorang)
Dec. 25 — High Holiday Hiatus

Categories: Organizations

Rotary Cogwheel | 11.13.2014

Thu, 11/13/2014 - 8:46am

Today: Nick Frohnaur, Minnesota DNR Invasive Fish and Mississippi River Habitat Coordinator (Anderson)

Birthdays: Erin Bailey (11/9), Lee Dilley (11/10) and Kathy Findley (11/13)

Next Week: Stacey Zell, Northfield Hospital Sleep Center (Schlichting)

Last Week:

Jonathan Adams, a St. Olaf College graduate who now works for Project: Restore in rural Thailand, says he is about raising friends, not money. But I think he would be willing to talk.

He first visited Thailand when he accompanied Mike and Ann Leming on their annual sojourn to the Thai hill country. He planned to volunteer for three months. That was five years ago. Now he is the project director and has learned more than he would have ever dreamed about sustainable agriculture, building relationships, working for community development and restorative justice.

The project’s focus is on living with the local population to learn what their needs are and to support their efforts toward stability and a sustainable life. They are working on crop diversification, developing a village nursery and seed bank, a Highland Sustainable Development Center, produce cooperatives, small business development and more.

“We don’t seek to provide answers,” he said. “We want to provide them options.”

Future goals include developing equipment cooperatives, alternative energy sources and revolving loan groups.


Paul Harris Fellows: Mark Abbott, Dave Brown and Charlie Cogan were recognized for their contributions to the Paul Harris Foundation this year.


Guests: Lydia, Giulia, Marcelo and Philipy (Rich), Paul Krause (Sinning), Ann and Mike Leming (V. Dilley)

Scholarship Enhancement: Greg Carlson

First Job: We can’t hear it, but he can. “I’ve Been Working on the Railroad” is always playing in his head, like a background soundtrack. That’s because Denny Hanson was a “gandy dancer,” a railroad maintenance man, back in the day before banking. He was slamming spikes and aligning rails in southern Minnesota during the hot summer months, while dreaming of an air-conditioned desk job.

Announcements:

— Rob Bierman said the volunteer slots for our Thanksgiving Turkey Trot are filling up nicely. If you are going to be in town that morning and not running the race, you are invited to sign up to be a registrar or a course monitor. Kurt Larson reported that online, early bird registration is going well. And we have 40 corporate sponsors this year. A food drive is a new element of this event. You can kick-start the drive by bringing a nonperishable food item to Rotary next week or to the race on Thanksgiving Day.

— Chris Weber announced that Community Resource Bank will be hosting an American Red Cross blood drive Wednesday, Nov. 26, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. To register go to www.redcrossblood.org or call 507-645-4441.

— Charlie Cogan said Shattuck St. Mary’s is in need of host families for students who are not going home for the Thanksgiving break Nov. 22 through December 1.

Past Northfield Rotary Club meeting videos on Youtube: NorthfieldRotaryClubVideos

Coming Up:

Nov. 27 — TURKEY TROT
Dec. 4 — District Governor DG Karel (Cogan)
Dec. 11 — President Matthew Rich
Dec. 18 — Kevin Born and Naomi Mortenson, Environmental Tillage Systems (Lorang)

Categories: Organizations

Rotary Cogwheel | 11.06.2014

Thu, 11/06/2014 - 6:35am

Today: Jonathan Adams, RESTORE Project Director (V. Dilley)

Birthdays: Sue Boxrud (11/5) and David Brown (11/6)

Next Week: Nick Frohner, Asian Carp (Anderson)

Last Week:

Sam Daly will choose a dog over a drone every time if it is bombs he wants detected.

His three years in Afghanistan training “bomb sniffing” dogs for the U.S. Marine Corps have convinced him of that.

“Despite all of the gadgets, dogs detect 30 percent more IEDs (improvised explosive devices) than all the other gadgets combined,” he said.

The owner of Northfield Kennels said a poor economy at home persuaded him to put his kennel business on hold and answer a call to take his dog-training skills overseas in 2011. This was the first time the military used off-leash dogs for this work. While it exposes the dogs to danger, it ultimately protects soldiers.

Sam said high-spirited athletic dogs, such as retrievers, Labradors and German Shepherds make the best bomb sniffers. They respond to laughter and play, and form strong emotional bonds with the handlers. Yet, the Marines are reminded that the dog is there because it is a “bomb detection asset,” not a companion.

In the sizzling Afghanistan heat, the dogs work for short, 20-minute spurts. They are hydrated to cool their core temperature and then sent back out. They are often the targets of the insurgents who plant the bombs because they know the dogs are good at what they do.

The dogs are subject to physical and emotional injury. Sam said there is such a thing as canine post traumatic stress disorder. Some also suffer separation anxiety when their tour is over.

Dogs do re-up once they have been recertified and retrained. Some have had five or six deployments. Once they reach the age of 8, they are retired and eligible for adoption, sometimes to their handlers.

Sam is now back working in Northfield. He trains dogs for law enforcement agencies, for service work, hunting and families.


Mini-Classification:

John Fossum and Sam Daly go way back. They’ve been part of each other’s life for almost 45 years. They went through school together in Northfield, graduating in 1983.

John went to Macalester College and moved back to Northfield in 1996 to practice law. At the time, Sam was operating Northfield Kennels.

John moved to Switzerland for a year and then worked in Afghanistan, training police and prosecutors. Sam also did a tour of duty in Afghanistan training dogs for bomb detection.

John is married to Tracy Fossum and they have one daugher, Liv.


Guests: Lydia, Giulia, Marcelo and Philipy (Rich), Rachel Estrella (Halverson), Tracy Fossum and Deb Sibley (Fossum).

Scholarship Enhancement: John Stull

First Job: Personally, I can’t picture Jim Pokorney doing manual labor. I think of him as more of an idea man. But preconceptions aside, he tells us he broke into the wonderful world of work shoveling coal for three weeks for a city public utility at $2 an hour. I bet he was waxing philosophic the whole time.

Announcements:

— Vicky Langer received a nod for her good work coordinating interviews of prospective outbound exchange students. She recognized the volunteers who were interviewers or observers.

— New member orientation will be Monday, Nov. 10, noon at Community Resource Bank. Lunch will be provided and entertaining speakers are promised. This is open to all members. Consider it a Rotary refresher.

— Rob Bierman is now actively recruiting for volunteers to help with our Thanksgiving Turkey Trot, one of our most productive fundraisers. He is still in need of someone to refresh the Turkey Trot signs. If you are going to be in town that morning, you are invited to sign up to be a registrar or a course monitor. Both require little heavy-lifting.

Past Northfield Rotary Club meeting videos on Youtube: NorthfieldRotaryClubVideos

Coming Up:

Nov. 20 — Stacey Zell, Northfield Hospital Sleep Center (Schlichting)

Nov. 27 — TURKEY TROT

Dec. 4 — District Governor DG Karel (Cogan)

Categories: Organizations

Rotary Cogwheel | 10.30.2014

Thu, 10/30/2014 - 5:46am

Today: Sam Daly, Sniffing for Bombs in Afghanistan (Fossum)

Birthdays: Sue Boxrud (11/5) and David Brown (11/6)

Next Week: Jonathan Adams, RESTORE Project Director (V. Dilley)

Last Week:

The Northfield Public Library is poised for its first major expansion in 30 years, one that will position it to meet the evolving needs of the digital age.

Char Carlson, chair of the Northfield Library Board, said recent city council action will allow for the $2.1 million project to move forward on an aggressive schedule. The hope is the project will be completed next fall.

The project’s guiding principles are to make the library more functional, more flexible and more welcoming. A major feature of the expansion is a handsome, commons area on the library’s east side. Plans call for additional meeting space, improved flow of the building, better staff space and more community space. Other items high on the list for improvements include better children spaces, improved bathrooms, and ADA accessibility issues.

The project received a major boost last week when the city council agreed to fund “life and safety” code improvements estimated to cost $262,000 and to offer another $252,000 in bridge financing to allow the library to continue its private fundraising. All of that is in addition to a $1 million allocation from the city’s capital budget and $90,000 for a scheduled upgrade of the HVAC system.

That means the project will require $702,000 in private funds of which $450,000 is already in hand, Carlson said.

If you want to help with the project, she had several suggestions:

  • Be informed about the project and share your knowledge and excitement with others;
  • Thank members of the City Council for their support;
  • Support the private fundraising campaign with a check, stock gift or multi-year pledge.

“Every gift is important,” Char said.

The library was founded in 1910 with a grant from the Andrew Carnegie Foundation. An expansion in 1985 tripled the space and moved the entrance from Third Street to Washington. There are currently 18,000 library card holders and 65,000 volumes in the collection.


Teresa Jensen, library director, said she doesn’t see the number of books in the collection increasing over time, but their digital and web presence will. For more on the campaign, go to: http://www.northfieldpubliclibraryfriends.org/capital-campaign.

Mini-Classification:

Teresa Jensen has Iowa roots, a Southern California childhood, and Minnesota sensibilities. The executive director of Northfield Public Library spent most of her professional life working for Minneapolis branch libraries. She was lured to San Antonio, Texas for four years and then family, specifically a grandchild, persuaded her to move back to Minnesota, where she is happily overseeing a major expansion of our library.


Guests: Lydia, Giulia, Marcelo and Philipy (Rich)

Scholarship Enhancement: Linda Wilgohs

First Job: “Metal Manufacturing Trade Magazine. Is this the party to whom I am speaking?” This was Jan Stevens’ first job. At age 18, she spent the summer as the receptionist for an eight-person editorial office in Illinois. She said she enjoyed it, especially the editors’ antics, but college was awaitin’.

Announcements:

— New member orientation will be Monday, Nov. 10, noon at Community Resource Bank. Lunch will be provided and entertaining speakers are promised. This is open to all members. Consider it a Rotary refresher.

— Rob Bierman is looking for someone to refresh the Turkey Trot signs. The new route that will begin and end at the Carleton College Weitz Center requires new signage. There are many ways to help with this project: 1) sign up to run; 2) volunteer for a very time-limited role on Thanksgiving morning or 3) Back to refreshing signage. It will also, for the first time, be a vehicle for collecting non-perishable food items for the Northfield Food Shelf. Runners will be invited to bring an item to the race.

Past Northfield Rotary Club meeting videos on Youtube: NorthfieldRotaryVideos

Coming Up:
Nov. 13 — Nick Frohner, Asian Carp (Anderson)

Nov. 20 — Stacey Zell, Northfield Hospital Sleep Center (Schlichting)

Nov. 27 — TURKEY TROT

Dec. 4 — District Governor DG Karel (Cogan)

Categories: Organizations

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