Northfield Rotary Club

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Rotary Cogwheel | 12.18.2014

Tue, 12/16/2014 - 8:09pm

Today: Kevin Born and Naomi Mortenson, Environmental Tillage Systems (Lorang)

Birthdays: Lots of candles this week: Jim Pokorney (12/7), Dean Johnson (12/14), Dale Ness and John Ophaug (12/15), Blake Abdella and Vicki Dilley (12/21), Virginia Kaczmarek (12/22), Bill Carlson (12/23), Rich Lorang and Neil Lutsky (12/27), Jake Conway (12/28), and Ingrid Sampo (1/2).

Next Week: Two week “holiday hiatus” then on January 8 we will have Libby McKenna here to talk about “Water Pumps in Southern Nepal” (Sinning)

Last Week:

Editor’s Note: This is a good example of “pretty close journalism.” During last week’s presentation, I was forced to take notes in the dark, so I may be a little fuzzy on the details. Thanks for your patience. Here it comes.

Do you want to see a $150 billion increase in annual giving to health and human service nonprofits?

Dan Pallotta, a social entrepreneur and humanitarian activist, believes it can happen if we rethink our approach to charitable fundraising. He says we have it all wrong. By borrowing some of the private sector’s rules of the road, we could dramatically increase the resources available for the causes we support.

President Rich shared a TED Talk Pallotta gave recently on this issue. Matthew said he hopes it will stimulate a conversation about our personal and club philosophies on charitable giving.

Charitable giving has been stable at about 2 percent of gross national product for the last 40 years. Even a 1 percent increase would generate another $150 billion annually, Pallotta estimates.

But he says, we have to stop confusing morality with frugality. Nonprofits’ success is limited by conventional beliefs that suggest: 1) Nonprofit executives should sacrifice compensation for the opportunity to work in a mission-driven organization; 2) Advertising is an expense, not an investment; 3) We must play safe with donated dollars, which discourages innovation and risk-taking; 4) We can’t afford to operate with long time horizons or long-term investments; 5) Overhead is a dirty word. There should never be money left over.

Progress on social and humanitarian initiatives is slow on many fronts. Poverty for 10 percent of our population is an intransigent problem. He said if we want to follow Buckminister Fuller’s advice and work for a “world that works for everyone” we need to make changes. That will be up to each one of us.

For another look at Pallotta’s TED talk, go to: http://www.ted.com/talks/dan_pallotta_the_way_we_think_about_charity_is_dead_wrong?language=en.

Guests: No guests today. Just us.

Scholarship Enhancement: Giulia Mercanti, our exchange student

Announcements:

— Today is the last day to submit a nomination for this year’s Good Neighbor Award. Please share your nomination with Erica Zweifel. Nominees who give expression to the Rotary motto “Service Above Self” will be considered. They must be a resident of the Northfield School District. Rotary members and their family members are not eligible.

— Rob Bierman tied up some loose ends on the Turkey Trot. The Weitz Center received good reviews as a staging area, and the results of an online survey of participants were very favorable. He also thanked Fred Rogers, Charlie Cogan and Joe Hargis for helping secure the Weitz Center for the event. Between donations and our gift of Great Harvest Bread, the event generated more than 1,000 pounds of food for the Northfield Food Shelf.

Rotary is responsible Meals-On-Wheels delivery the first two full weeks of January. If you are interested in driving, sign up on our web site or check with Lynne Pederson.

— Vicki Dilley is recovering from back surgery. A bulletin was circulated and members shared words of encouragement.

— Twenty-one Northfield students were among the 70 that attended Country Fair Dec. 6. They will soon learn if they have been selected for an exchange year.

Coming Up:

Dec. 29 — YEAR (Youth Exchange And Reflections)

Jan. 15 — Ramiz Allawala, Wellstone Training (Taylor)

Jan. 22 — Liz Blanchard, Northfield Women’s Center (Amerman)

Jan. 29 — Lydia shares her youth exchange experience.

Categories: Organizations

Rotary Cogwheel | 12.11.2014

Thu, 12/11/2014 - 9:55am

Today: President Matthew Rich Promises Something Unconventional

Birthdays: Jim Holden (12/6) Rotarians Across the Globe!

Next Week: Kevin Born and Naomi Mortenson, Environmental Tillage Systems (Lorang)

Last Week:

District Governor Karel Weigel has her elevator speech down pat.

“Rotary’s most important job is to do good in the world,” she says.

Five core values — fellowship, service, diversity, integrity and leadership — guide the Rotary mission. It is the fellowship and the service that make Rotary the vital organization that it is, she said. Those two values are what really inspire members to support youth exchange, water and sanitation projects, literacy and polio eradication.

The key to sustainable community development, the governor said, is to build relationships before we build stuff. A project model used in Nicaragua gets her endorsement. First help the local people dream. Then, figure out how they can achieve those dreams and then set it all in motion.

She reminded us of the underpinnings of successful humanitarian service. We need strong, active clubs and an enhanced public image. People need to know what we do and how we do it.

Karel looks to the late revered anthropologist Margaret Mead for inspiration and motivation. Quoting Mead, Karel said:

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful , committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.”


Mini-Classification:

Charlie Cogan’s life changed when he went to Togo as a Peace Corps volunteer in the mid-1980s. He met his wife there, and they now have three children and a grandchild. He joined Rotary in 1988 while living in Evanston, Ill. He saw the organization as a vehicle to improve health care in Togo after his wife’s younger brother died there. Charlie continues to see the opportunity to improve lives and build understanding through Rotary.

 Guests: Kim Briske, Director of Technology Services for Northfield Public Schools (Hillmann), Judy Dirks (Yogi) and Elizabeth Child, Executive Director of Northfield Area United Way, (Estenson).

Scholarship Enhancement: David Halsor

Announcements:

— Wow! Despite this year’s frigid temperatures — coldest Thanksgiving since Hoover was president, according to Rob Bierman — the Turkey Trot netted more than $17,000. Again, wow! We had 900 run-walkers registered and a courageous 800 took the plunge, I mean made the run. Greg Carlson, Rotary’s human Timex — he keeps on ticking — took club bragging rights for the umpteenth year. Nice job everyone.

— If you have a nomination for this year’s Good Neighbor Award, talk to Erica Zweifel. Nominees who give expression to the Rotary motto “Service Above Self” will be considered. They must be a resident of the Northfield School District. Rotary members and their family members are not eligible. Check our web site for a nomination form. Nominations need to be in by Thursday, Dec. 18. Last year’s award went to Margit Johnson; Zach Pruitt received it the year before that.

Rotary is responsible Meals-On-Wheels delivery the first two full weeks of January. If you are interested in driving, let Lynne Pederson know.

— Congratulations to Beth Kallestad and the Cannon River Watershed Partnership for winning an $88,213 grant from the Bush Foundation and also to Todd Thompson, whose “kickstart” appeal generated $10,000 for music education in Guatemala. Matt Hillmann finally completed his doctorate degree from Minnesota University Mankato. He finished his academic career just two years before his eldest son is ready for college.

Past Northfield Rotary Club meeting videos on Youtube: NorthfieldRotaryClubVideos

Coming Up:
Dec. 25 — High Holiday Hiatus. See you next year.

Jan. 8 — Libby McKenna, Water Pumps in Southern Nepal (Sinning)

Jan. 15 — Ramiz Allawala, Wellstone Training (Taylor)

Jan. 22 — Liz Blanchard, Northfield Women’s Center (Ammerman)

Categories: Organizations

Rotary Cogwheel | 12.04.2014

Tue, 12/02/2014 - 7:34am

Today: District Governor DG Karel (Cogan)

Birthdays: Art Monaghan (11/25), Beth Kallestad (11/26), Sam Gett (11/27), Matt Hillmann (11/29), Chris Kennelly (12/1), John Erhresmann (12/4), and Alan Anderson (12/5).

Next Week: President Matthew Rich Promises Something Unconventional

 Last Week: 

Forty-three million Americans suffer from some kind of a sleep disorder. A large percentage of those go undiagnosed. If not treated, sleep disorders can lead to a host of chronic medical problems, from heart attacks and strokes to diabetes and depression.

Stacey Zell, coordinator of the Sleep Center at Northfield Hospital, said the hospital provides “gold standard” sleep studies to aid in the diagnosis of sleep disorders. They perform 500 a year for a wide range of people in a variety of circumstances. The center is staffed by Bryan Hoff, MD, and Gerard O’Halloran, MD. Both are certified in Sleep Medicine. John Noack, DDS, of Professional Drive Dental, also works closely with the center.

“In a small community, we are very fortunate to have two board certified physicians involved,” Stacey said.

The center features two sleep suites that provide a hotel-like experience. Each is tastefully decorated and equipped with comfortable Sleep Number double beds. The suites have private baths and business workstations. They are climate controlled and soundproof with special lighting that can replicate patients’ sleeping conditions at home.

The center monitors sleep patterns in real time. The testing is done over an eight to nine-hour period. Typically, patients arrive at the Sleep Center around eight or nine at night. A sleep study technician arranges the sensors to monitor heart rate, oxygen levels and eye movement while the patient sleeps. The technician monitors them from a workstation outside the sleep suite. Video is used in select circumstances.

Patients are usually able to leave by 5 or 6 a.m. A breakfast bar is available for a quick start to the day. The center also accommodates daytime testing for those who work at night or do shift work, and studies can be done on weekends.

The definition of a “good night’s sleep” is unique to the individual, Stacey said. Most adults need seven to nine hours a night of restful sleep. Most of us get more like 6 ½. If we wake up refreshed, there is no reason to worry.

But untreated sleep apnea can cause problems. Because of obstructed airways, some problem sleepers wake up 20 to 60 times an hour. There are remedies such as CPAP machines and oral appliances.

For more information, go to: northfieldhospital.org/services/sleep-center/ or call Stacey at 507-646-1194.


Mini-Classification:

Jim Schlichting grew up on a family farm in southern Minnesota. He earned a degree in Economics and then served in the U.S. Navy. He graduated from law school at Rutgers University and eventually moved back to Minnesota, where he practiced law for 30 years in Albert Lea and then Northfield. He currently serves on the Northfield Hospital & Clinics board of directors.


Guests: Marlene Gargulak, our next district governor (Vicky Dilley), Kathy Jasnoch (Kaczmarek), Jane McWilliams and Kari Nelson, Skateboard Coalition (Conway)

Scholarship Enhancement: Robert Craig

Rotary Moment:

President Rich does not like to do dishes, but Justin Stets does. Somehow — and you will have to ask Mathew how — that relates to the inspiration Mathew receives when he looks out at the membership during our weekly meetings.

 

Announcements:

— If you have a nomination for this year’s Good Neighbor Award, talk to Erica Zweifel. Nominees who give expression to the Rotary motto “Service Above Self” will be considered. They must be a resident of the Northfield School District. Rotary members and their family members are not eligible. Check our web site for a nomination form. Nominations need to be in by Thursday, Dec. 18. Last year’s award went to Margit Johnson; Zach Pruitt received it the year before that.

— Robert Bierman reported a record 825 online registrations for the Turkey Trot. Stay tuned for today’s full report on how heroic runners and course monitors battled frigid temperatures for charity.


— Jean Wakely reminds us to wear our yellow Rotary T-shirt whenever we are out and about volunteering. We need to pray in public once in a while. It is good advertising for the club.

— Happy News: It was a good week for Rotarians. Peg Prowe survived a heart attack, and Jack Hoschauer survived a motor vehicle rollover. Jan Stevens reported that Wenger Corporation of Owatonna, a manufacturer of performing arts spaces and accessories, has donated $10,000 to the vintage band festival.

Past Northfield Rotary Club meeting videos on Youtube: NorthfieldRotaryClubVideos

Coming Up:

Dec. 18 — Kevin Born and Naomi Mortenson, Environmental Tillage Systems (Lorang)

Dec. 25 — High Holiday Hiatus. See you next year.

Categories: Organizations

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