My Northern Garden - Mary Schier

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Sharing experiences and ideas about cold-climate gardening
Updated: 51 min 45 sec ago

Winter Sowing Native Plants, Two Ways

Mon, 02/16/2015 - 10:51am

A week ago, we had a few days of pleasant 30-degree weather here in Minnesota, perfect weather for winter sowing native plants for the meadow I maintain behind my house. The meadow has been challenging, to say the least. There is a lot of weed pressure near it (and in it). It’s been one of those garden projects that reminds you just how small and ineffective you are compared to Nature, with a capital N.

So, I was thrilled to see that Prairie Moon Nursery, where I bought most of the plants and seeds I’ve used in the meadow, was offering a Jungle Prairie Mix of seeds. According to Prairie Moon, the Jungle Mix  “includes the most robust and competitive prairie plants available. The Jungle Prairie is perfect for a weedy ditch, a privacy screen, or for just establishing a profusion of flowers while providing habitat for wildlife.” Sounds good to me.

Seeds waiting for spring

I ordered enough seeds for 2,000 square feet to spread on the meadow. I also liked that this is a project they recommend you do during winter — a time when I’m less busy in the garden anyway. (Prairie plants tend to need stratification to germinate — that is, the process of breaking the seed coat by repeated freezing and thawing — so sowing them in winter allows the process to happen naturally.)

The directions for spreading the seeds call for dividing your area into smaller spaces so that the seeds are more evenly spread. I visually divided the meadow in four, then mixed one-quarter of the seeds with a filler material and spread it on each section by tossing it as evenly as I could. My husband raised the issue that birds would eat the seed, but we did not see any increase in bird activity after casting the seeds. We have a feeder not too far from the meadow, so hopefully they will get their sustenance there.

While working on that type of winter sowing, I dug out some of my seeds from last year. I found several kinds of seeds that work well in the meadow—lupine, prairie coreopsis, rose milkweed, and asters, among others—and decided to sow them in traditional winter sowing containers. That way I can place them in the meadow, where I think they will look best. (Read the first paragraph of this post again and ask yourself: Why is it so hard to let go of control?)

Anyway, I have complete instructions on winter sowing in containers on the blog and followed them, using a fairly light potting mix, which included potting soil, perlite and vermiculite. Three of the winter sowing boxes are outside now and more will be added as we empty lettuce containers and milk jugs here.

Will you be winter sowing this year?

 

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Categories: Citizens

Gift Idea: A Spring Garden for Valentine’s Day

Tue, 02/10/2015 - 9:26am

The Watch ‘em Grow basket arrives with some growth.

Are you looking for a gift idea for your valentine this week? If he or she is a gardener or someone who likes flowers, let me suggest this pre-planted bulb garden the folks at Bachman’s are offering. Called Watch ‘em Grow, the pots come in 8 or 10 inch sizes and are planted with an assortment of spring bulbs: tulips, daffodils, hyacinths and muscari.

When they arrive, the bulbs are just starting to grow. Give them a little water and set them in a bright spot, and in a week or so, your valentine will have blooms. Mine arrived January 26 and by February 4, the cutest tiny daffodils I’ve ever seen on it were in bloom. Today, the hyacinths are also blooming (one light pink, one dark purple) and the tulips are just starting to break open. I’m guessing I will have blooms for about 10 more days.

Pretty spring colors!

Fresh flowers are a wonderful gift, but I like something that you can watch grow and enjoy for several weeks. Other suggestions for a Valentine’s Day gift for the gardener in your life?

  • Seeds! How about seeds for a butterfly garden? Or a selection of tomato seeds with unusual names or flavors?
  • A tree. A few nurseries are open now and you can get a gift certificate for a tree.
  • A book about gardening or cooking. Some of my recent favorites include The Layered Garden, Groundbreaking Food Gardens, and for planning how to cook up all the good vegetables your gardener will grown next year, Amy Thielen’s The New Midwestern Table. (Check out the March/April issue of Northern Gardener for an article on the garden Amy and her husband, Aaron Spangler, tend in northern Minnesota.)
  • A CSA share. OK, this is a big one. But, if your gardener does not grow a lot of food, but loves fresh food (and who doesn’t?) how about a share or partial share in a local community supported agriculture farm? You can find a list of regional CSAs here.
  • Fresh flowers. A bouquet is lovely and much better for the figure than a box of chocolates.

Enjoy the holiday!

Disclosure: I was sent the Watch ‘em Grow basket free of charge for review purposes. My policy is to review products only if I like them. If I don’t like them, I will not mention them on this blog or in social media.

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Categories: Citizens

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