Colleges

Whiteness as default

Carletonian - Fri, 05/15/2015 - 12:00pm

This nation was built on white supremacy, and no amount of multicultural Coca-Cola commercials, or peace prizes for Obama, or seasons of The Wire is going to fix that.

Categories: Colleges

No one wants to ride their bicycle: Carleton’s neglected bikes

Carletonian - Fri, 05/15/2015 - 12:00pm

Left to rust, locked on a tree or light pole, sad, solitary bikes are consistently deserted by their owners each year.

Categories: Colleges

It's spring and it smells like... fire?

Carletonian - Fri, 05/15/2015 - 12:00pm
Categories: Colleges

From Bilbo Baggins to bumble bees, EDB explores with grace

Carletonian - Fri, 05/15/2015 - 12:00pm

With an overflowing audience on opening night, Experimental Dance Board, EDB, performed both their Friday and Saturday night shows to a packed Weitz dance studio.

Categories: Colleges

ETB’s Closer crosses the pond

Carletonian - Fri, 05/15/2015 - 12:00pm

Three things I love convening in one play: London, nineties fashion, and theatre. There was no way I could hate this week’s ETB production, Patrick Marber’s Closer, directed by Emma Halper ‘18.

Categories: Colleges

Nolan Baker Selected to Academic All District Team

Carletonian - Fri, 05/15/2015 - 12:00pm

Carleton College senior Nolan Baker was named as the designated hitter on the Academic All-District First Team as selected by the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA).

Categories: Colleges

Women’s Golf leads MIAC in distinctions

Carletonian - Fri, 05/15/2015 - 12:00pm

The Knights women's golf team claimed three of the top four MIAC individual honors.

Categories: Colleges

Women’s tennis recieves six MIAC Awards

Carletonian - Fri, 05/15/2015 - 12:00pm

A half-dozen members of the Carleton College women’s tennis team earned a total of seven All-MIAC honors for the 2015 season.

Categories: Colleges

This is what allies look like

Carletonian - Fri, 05/15/2015 - 12:00pm

We must fight unconditionally. We must be willing to question and be ready to hold ourselves accountable, as we are equally capable of being both oppressors and allies.

Categories: Colleges

Trimesters, or maybe just trying too hard

Carletonian - Fri, 05/15/2015 - 12:00pm

I spoke with two professors, both of which had taught previously at semester schools, to understand why we should, and should not, remain a trimester school.

Categories: Colleges

Polygraph Lounge’s musical “arsenal” varies in accuracy

Carletonian - Fri, 05/15/2015 - 12:00pm

Classically unorthodox, Polygraph Lounge, a musical duo self-described as “inspired lunacy/ anarchy fired from a veritable arsenal of original instruments & vocal stylings”, performed at Carleton’s Concert Hall on May 8th and 9th.

Categories: Colleges

Students draw into cyber- space

Carletonian - Fri, 05/15/2015 - 12:00pm

Room Draw goes online, enters 21st century

Categories: Colleges

Carleton wins MN alcohol & drug grant

Carletonian - Fri, 05/15/2015 - 12:00pm

Carleton has been chosen to receive a grant from the Minnesota Department of Human Services (DHS) to cut underage drinking and drug use on campus.

Categories: Colleges

Crowd eats up Lenny Deep Dish

Carletonian - Fri, 05/15/2015 - 12:00pm

The sketch comedy group Lenny Dee premiered their spring term show on Thursday night in Little Nourse Theatre.

Categories: Colleges

Nature, cruel and complex

Carletonian - Fri, 05/15/2015 - 12:00pm

Tsegaye Nega: From Ethiopian Refugee to Carleton Professor

Categories: Colleges

Taylor Wells Voted to Academic All-District Team Again

Carleton Sports - Thu, 05/14/2015 - 10:03pm

Carleton College women’s golfer Taylor Wells was recognized once again for her excellence in the classroom and in competition, as the senior was a repeat selection to the Academic All-District At-Large Team, as voted by the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA). She also took home the honor in 2014.

Categories: Colleges

Music Dialogues Lecture

Manitou Messenger - Thu, 05/14/2015 - 9:53pm

The Musical Dialogues Conference, which is a collaboration between St. Olaf and Carleton colleges, aims to provide a forum for students to share original research and creative work. Multiple students from both schools presented their projects and papers regarding music and some of the deeper meanings behind music. Music faculty at the two colleges host the symposium with support from the Broadening the Bridge initiative. Broadening the Bridge launched last January as a result of collaboration between St. Olaf College President David Anderson and Carleton College President Steven Poskanzer. The initiative attempts to foster teamwork and communication between the two Northfield colleges.

University of Michigan Associate Professor of Musicology, American Culture and African American Studies Mark Clague delivered the keynote speech for the Musical Dialogues symposium on May 2 to St. Olaf and Carleton students and faculty gathered in Dittman Center.  His lecture, entitled “This Is America: Jimi Hendrix’s Reimaginings of ‘The Star-Spangled Banner’ at Woodstock and Beyond,” focused on intersections of  American culture and music, specifically how music symbolizes what it means to be a citizen and a nation.

Categories: Colleges

The Love Column

Manitou Messenger - Thu, 05/14/2015 - 9:52pm

When our parents bought their first mobile phones in the early aught’s, they were used exclusively for emergencies. Now we assume that our friend is having an emergency if they don’t respond to a text within fifteen minutes.

Most of us carry computers in our pockets that are more powerful than the machinery that was used to put people on the moon. Technology is changing and we’re changing with it.

Our cellphones have become extensions of ourselves. Most college students can’t go anywhere or do anything without their mobile device.

Though they enable us to have quick, reliable communication with people outside our immediate vicinity, cell phones negatively impact how we interact with those around us. Whether we’re texting, checking our Facebook or swiping on Tinder, cellphones consume our attention, even when we are engaged in a good personal conversation. It’s distracting and frustrating for a group dynamic when one or more people are so engrossed in texting that vibrating ringtones interrupt every other word.

It seems that we use cellphones as everything except as a phone. In terms of efficiency, this doesn’t make any sense. Mobile phones were created to improve our communication, but they have regressed it instead.

When we type text messages, we have to engage much of our focus. We use our eyes to watch the screen for typos, engage our thumbs to type and put our concentration on developing a succinct message.

We’re fooling ourselves if we think that we can still be present while doing all that. When the response comes, we again revert our attention away from our surroundings back to the screen in our palm. This back and forth can go on for ages. This takes time away from quality interactions with friends and family members, not to mention paying attention in class.

Why not call? It may seem old fashioned but it’s much quicker and more personal than texting. Telephones are remarkable; we have the ability to hear the voice and expression of friends that are miles away. Quality of conversation is also higher because you are completely focused on that conversation with the person on the other end the whole time.

By calling people, we can connect at a more human level without all the hassle and misunderstanding that plagues texting. We have all had those awkward experiences of someone interpreting a text message in a way that we did not intend.

We also don’t irritate the people around us by being distracted for long periods of time, like we do when we when we are texting (have you ever worked on a group project with one of those people? It’s the worst). A one minute call accomplishes the work of ten minutes of texting.

My challenge to you this summer is be conscious of how often you text. If you’re doing it to make plans or flirt, consider dropping a line instead so that you can showcase your personality.

Rather than just typing little quips, make plans to get together. Face-to-face interaction time is seriously declining among our generation, in both amount and quality.

Spend that time being present with the people you love rather than letting your phone distract you with what’s far away or coming next.

mcmillap@stolaf.edu

Are you an expert on all things romantic? Let everyone on campus benefit from your fabulous advice! Email mess-ae@stolaf.edu for more information on becoming one of our love columnists for next year’s Manitou Messenger.

-the A&E Editors

Categories: Colleges

Knights Stumble on Moving Day, Now Tied for Seventh at NCAA Championships

Carleton Sports - Thu, 05/14/2015 - 9:27pm

Grace Gilmore fired an eight-over par 80 to remain inside the top 10 individually while Taylor Wells tallied her best round of the NCAA Championships with an 81, but moving day saw the Carleton College women’s golf team go in reverse as the Knights shot a 335 to drop into a tie for seventh.

Categories: Colleges

Olympia Snowe stresses importance of bipartisanship

Manitou Messenger - Thu, 05/14/2015 - 9:14pm

On Wednesday, April 29 the Political Awareness Committee invited former Republican senator Olympia Snowe to speak to the St. Olaf community. She served as one of Maine’s senators from 1995 to 2013. Snowe made history as the fourth woman in American politics to be elected to both houses of Congress and the first to serve in both houses of a state legislature. Snowe is known for her criticism of the extreme partisanship in Congress, as outlined in her 2013 book,  Fighting for Common Ground: How We Can Fix the Stalemate in Congress. Her speech, entitled “What’s Gone Wrong in Washington and Why it Doesn’t Have to Be This Way,”  addressed these problems and challenged students to rethink the paralyzing divide of modern-day Congress.

Snowe started her speech with a summary of her personal background. Both of her Greek immigrant parents died before she was nine. After this tragedy, she moved in with her aunt and uncle but continued to commute over an hour to school every day, occasionally getting stranded in Grand Central Station overnight and sleeping on benches. She has always considered herself “a minority of a minority of a minority,” as a female Greek-American from New York who moved to Maine.

On Snowe’s first day as a senator of Maine, Senate Majority Leader Robert Dole caught her looking around the chambers in awe. He said to her, “You are looking around wondering how you got here, but in six months you will be looking around wondering how everyone else got here.” She found out he was right.

“There are smart people in Congress, but there are fewer and fewer who are willing to reach across the aisle and act bipartisan,” Snowe said. She discovered that for many Congressmen, the first priority was working towards re-election instead of focusing on making productive changes during their current term. She expressed frustration that many politicians only care about the potential gain of political capital from each bill rather than the content of the bill itself and therefore sacrifice bipartisanship to please donors and constituencies.”

The 2013 and 2014 Congressional sessions were the least productive in modern history. The last time Congress was this ineffective was in 1805, when the government ran out of money after the Louisiana Purchase. This extreme gridlock is unacceptable to Snowe.

She maintained that when Congress fails to accomplish anything, the American citizens feel the lack of productivity and lose trust in the government. She cited that the recent presidential election had the lowest turnout of voters – 36 percent – since 1942 when America was at war.

“Americans feel powerless to affect the process,” Snowe said. “They don’t receive any benefit from participating in their democracy.”

In 2014, over half of the American public supported compromise across party lines. Snowe believes that now is the time to enact change.

She went on to detail many of her accomplishments during her years in Congress and how she personally tried to end partisanship and encourage compromise. Because of her work, she was named the 54th most powerful woman in the world by Forbes magazine in 2005 and one of the top 10 U.S. Senators by Time magazine in 2006.

In 2012, Snowe chose not to seek re-election to the Senate, but she has stayed committed to encouraging bipartisanship in Congress.

  “I did not leave the United States Senate because I no longer believed in its potential, but precisely because I do. I wanted to give voice to the millions of Americans who believe as I do that the Congress has gone awry,” Snowe said.

“After having two hyper-polarizing political leaders from either side of the aisle, Newt Gingrich last spring, and Rev. Al Sharpton in the fall, it was great for PAC to have someone that stresses bipartisanship,” said Grace Kane ’15, a previous College Republicans representative on PAC.

Snowe urged the audience to speak up about the importance of bipartisanship, saying that “silence is not golden. We have to demand cooperation, and the voices that demand cooperation have to be louder than the voices that demand polarization.”

dipietro@stolaf.edu

Photo Credit: KATELYN REGENSCHEID/MANITOU MESSENGER

Categories: Colleges

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