Organizations

Rotary Cogwheel | 09.29.2016

Northfield Rotary Club - Tue, 09/27/2016 - 3:16pm

Today’s Program | Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016

Today: Joe Wakely, Clean Drinking Water in Guatemala (Halverson)

Birthdays: Don Robertson (9/25); Jim Blaha, Chad Hjellming, Hugh Kaste, and Gerhard Meidt (9/27); Laurie Williams, (9/28); Rob Bierman and Kurt Larson (9/29) and Rachel McIves Morey (9/30).

Next Week: Bruce Morlan, Classified.

Last Week:
James J. Hill’s legacy is alive and well.

The legendary “empire builder,” best known for his privately-financed, inter-continental railroad, believed in changing the world by championing entrepreneurialism, said Patrick Donahue, President and CEO of Hill Capital Corporation. Hill helped 19th century settlers become more economically stable by introducing them to new crops and new breeds of livestock. He also established the James J. Hill Reference Library in St. Paul to provide entrepreneurs the resources they needed to develop business ideas.

In the spirit of James J. Hill and with support from the James J. Hill Center, the Hill Capital Corporation was formed in 2016. Its goal is “economic barn-raising,” Patrick said. Entrepreneurs need access to quality capital. It is especially acute for those whose needs are too big for community banks, but not big enough to attract institutional investors.

Angie’s Popcorn out of Mankato is a good example, Patrick said. When Angie and her husband decided to give up their conventional employment to scale up their business, she was forced to use credit cards to find the capital to buy inputs and pay people. At any point in time, there are thousands just like her, Patrick said.

Hill Capitol is essentially a private-equity, venture capital firm. Its investors are entrepreneurs or retired executives who share a commitment to small business development.

For more information, go to: www.hillcapitalcorporation.com.

Mini-Classification:

Mike Leming gave some background on the upcoming Kevin Kling show Saturday evening, Oct. 28, a fundraiser for Interact Center for the Visual and Performing Arts. Interact is national leader in creating art opportunities for artists with disabilities. In 2010, Mike saw one of their shows and invited the director to Thailand, where he has an ongoing interest in human development.

Over a period of five years, Interact drew from groups with a variety of disabilities to create a community of performers. Their productions inspired the Thai government to build a $10 million therapy facility. Mike encouraged members to attend the Kling show and support efforts to bring hope and joy to our friends in Thailand. Tickets are $25 and are available online at klingnf.org.

Guests: Larry Fowler (S. Richardson), Al Kalter and Rick Istead (V. Dilley)

Scholarship Enhancement: Chris Weber

Announcements:

Chris Heineman, chair of the DJJD Bike Tour Committee, said a final, final tally on the bike tour is not yet available, but revenue is now at $24,500, not a high water mark, but an increase over last year’s number.

The Turkey Trot Committee is now actively looking for sponsors for this year’s 5K run/walk Thanksgiving morning. Rick Estenson asked that club members think about becoming a sponsor if they own a business. This year, we will pilot a Wild Free-Range Turkey Trot contest for those who will not be in Northfield November 24. We are using social media to invite those with a Rotary affiliation, former exchange students, their families and the like, to sign up and provide a photo or video for our web site the day of the race. We will vote on the best one and provide a prize or assign bragging rights to the most creative “trot.” Spread the word.

Dick Schulte, Fred Rogers, Jean Wakely and Erica Zweifel contributed to the Cannon River cleanup September 17. They worked along the river in Cannon Falls.

We need 40 volunteers to help interview prospective outbound exchange students on Monday, Oct. 24. Your help is needed from 5 to 9 p.m. that evening. There will be pizza and training. Rachel Estrella is expecting 20 students. We need two interviewers for each student. See her if you can help.

Today is the last chance to purchase 2016 Bike Tour T-shirts. They are on sale in the lobby at the discounted price of $8.

Inbound students are:
Daniel Chien from Taiwan

Emma Nielsen from Denmark

Nico Suarez Toloza from Colombia

Eric Kwun from South Korea
Wanzita Ally from Tanzania
Matteo Lombardo, Italy

Our 2016-17 outbound students are:

Sage Brinton, Argentina

McKenna Dale, Brazil

Caroline Hummel, Norway

Noah Klein, South Korea

Jane Ludwig, Colombia

Yizel Marcial, Germany

Daiki Nishioka, Taiwan

Liliana (Lily) Noble, Italy

Madison Peterson-Bradford, Brazil

Emma Pritchard, Taiwan

Nathaniel Urke, Brazil.

Coming Up

October 13 — Mike Strobel, The Making of Aurora Pharmaceuticals, (Reese)

October 20 — Melanie Freeze, Carleton College, “What’s Ahead in the Election,” (Holden)

October 27 — Breanna Wheeler, River Bend Nature Center’s New Start, (Madigan)

November 3 — Dan Knutson, Classification, (Rich)

Categories: Organizations

Tom Bisel is Making a Difference

Northfield Healthy Community Initiative - Sat, 09/24/2016 - 5:49pm

Northfield Healthy Community Initiative (HCI) recently recognized Tom Bisel, owner of Downtown Bicycles in Northfield, with the September 2016 “Making a Difference” Award.

The award is given out monthly to community members or organizations that help to make Northfield an even better place for young people.

Downtown Bicycles, formerly Fit to be TRI’d, began in 2009 as a store specializing in high quality products and services for multi-sport athletes. It has evolved into a full-service bike shop offering new and used bikes, service, repair and accessories.

Tom believes in superior customer service, and it is evident in his store as he is often found educating his customers, and providing them with information and resources to meet their own fitness goals. Bill Nelson, co-owner of the Tiny’s building where Downtown Bicycles is currently located, has known Tom since he opened his store in 2009.

“I’ve seen Tom adjust his business in many ways to cater to young people,” Nelson said. “Tom is a skilled enough cyclist to ride only with the fastest bikers in town. Instead, he often organizes youth rides to help young riders develop as cyclists. Each year, I see Tom or a member of his staff helping with bike readiness at the Y Kids Tri here in Northfield.”

In addition, for the past several years, Tom has hired and trained one or more local high school students in his shop.

“I’ve personally seen these people grow dramatically as bike mechanics and salespeople,” noted Nelson.

Amy Lunderby of HCI echoes Tom’s commitment to local youth.

“We have worked with Tom recently in our out-of-school-time programming, and he has gone above and beyond in supporting our programs and ensuring that we have high-quality, safe bikes or accessories when necessary,” she said. “He has proven to be a tremendous community partner, donating countless hours to Northfield kids.”

An accomplished triathlete and cyclist, Tom works hard to help each customer in his shop feel safe and comfortable on their bikes, no matter their skill level.

“Tom has done a beautiful job of offering the people of this community the knowledge, skill sets and equipment to ride safely and have fun while doing it,” said Laura Meyers of BikeNorthfield. “He has generously volunteered his time coordinating classes and rides and sharing his particular know-how with others. He’s been a pleasure to work with as a fellow cyclist and advocate!”

The Healthy Community Initiative and the Northfield News present the Making a Difference Award cooperatively. If you know an individual or group that you would like to nominate for this award, visit www.northfieldhci.org for nomination guidelines and the easy-to-complete application, or find HCI on Facebook. Applications are accepted on an ongoing basis and are selected by a review team of HCI board members and local youth. By Cheryl Strike, Northfield Healthy Community Initiative
Categories: Organizations

Tree Dedication

Northfield Public Library - Kids Info - Thu, 09/22/2016 - 2:40pm
The 2 plaques together by
the tree.President of the Josiah Edson Chapter of the DAR
presided over the re-dedication.Northfield Library Board President Amy
Goerowitz and Mayor Dana Graham spoke
to the crowd of @75 people.Northfield  VFW Color GuardUnveiling the plaque
Many thanks to 
The Josiah Edson Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution
Saturday, September, 24, 2016 at 10 am
The Story:Originally dedicated on May 7, 1932, the bronze plaque and a Washington Elm tree were a gift to the Northfield Carnegie Library given by Josiah Edson Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution. After the death of the tree, the plaque went into storage and was lost.

Three Iowa women found it at a sale in Iowa and returned the plaque to the Josiah Edson Chapter. Today as we remember those whose work went before us, we rededicate the original plaque and dedicate a Patriot Elm with its own plaque.

Categories: Organizations

Rotary Cogwheel | 09.22.2016

Northfield Rotary Club - Tue, 09/20/2016 - 11:38am

Today’s Program | Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016

Today: Patrick Donahue, James J. Hill Center (K. Hargis)

Birthdays: Ryan Blumhoefer (9/21) and Jack Hoschouer (9/22)

Next Week: Joe Wakely, Clean Drinking Water in Guatemala (Halverson)

Last Week:
After listening last week to Gerard O’Halloran, MD, an ENT specialist at Northfield Hospital & Clinics, I ran home and sold my stock in Q-Tips.

Dr. O’Halloran says they are no good. Ears are pretty much self-cleaning, he said, and can be managed with a simple finger swipe. Q-Tips, on the other hand, can cause some real damage if they push wax against the ear drum. Good to know.

There are other things he wishes his patients knew. For instance, the best method for stopping nosebleeds is to pinch the middle part of the nose with your thumb and pointer finger for about 10 minutes. If it doesn’t stop, put a cotton ball up the nose and pinch it again to spare yourself a trip to the Emergency Department.

Most sinus headaches are really nasal headaches, he said, caused by swelling of the middle turbinate. Thirty percent of these can be treated with a nasal spray.

Sleep apnea remains a significantly under-diagnosed medical condition, Dr. O’Halloran said. Ten percent of men have it. About five percent of women do, too. Yet, only 10 percent of those folks are diagnosed and treated.

Sleep apnea has real health consequences. It increases the risk of stroke and heart attack. It can lead to high blood pressure, Alzhiemer’s and dementia, even attention deficit disorder. Those with neck circumferences of 17 inches or more have an 80 percent chance of suffering from sleep apnea, he said. Most sleep apnea sufferers don’t think they have it, but 85 percent snore loudly. So, if your spouse says you have it, you probably do.

Diagnostic tests are now much more convenient with home studies available. The CPAP machine, which blows a steady current of air into your throat to keep it open during sleep, is a standard treatment. There is also a dental appliance that has had good results, Dr. O’Halloran said.

Mini-Classification:
Betsy Spethmann was reminded recently what a privilege it is to work as Director of Community Relations at Northfield Hospital & Clinics. On the same day she saw an elderly couple emerge from the Cancer Care & Infusion Center supportively walking hand-in-hand, she saw a father taking a young child to First Touch Birth Center to meet a new sibling. Some of people’s most important and life-changing events happen at the hospital. She said she is proud to play a small part in what happens there.

Guests: Steve Edwards (Koenig), Jake Cook (Schulte), Evelyn the Cook (Yogi) and our exchange students.

Scholarship Enhancement: Jack Hoschouer

Committee Report:

Our Local Donations Committee reports that $6,000 was given out to 17 different organizations and projects during the last fiscal year. Our donations were as follows: $500 to Northfield Retirement Center, Hope Center, Ruth’s House, Community Action Center, Union of Youth, HealthFinders, Epic Enterprises, and Operation Backpack; $400 to Cannon River Watershed River Cleanup; $300 to Friends of Way Park for Pollinator Project; $275 to Northfield Goal Club; $250 to Northfield Library (Trivia Bee), Northfield Youth Choir, Northfield Community Band; $150 to Human Rights Commission (Martin Luther King, Jr. celebration); $100 to Earth Day; and $25 to CAC Food Shelf.

Announcements:

Bike tour numbers dipped this year, but 747 riders still had a great experience biking through Rice and Goodhue counties on a glorious September day. Final numbers are not yet in, but it looks like total revenue came in at $20,000. Thanks to all who volunteered with the bike tour. Now on to the Turkey Trot!

Our Rotary district and the Fast for Hope Committee is sponsoring a cultural delegation to Nicaragua October 21-30. The cost per person will be about $2,000, depending on airfare. The purpose of the trip is to learn more about the culture, the history, the people and the beauty of Nicaragua. Registration closes tomorrow. If you are interested, or want more information, please see President Lasswell.

Inbound students are:
Daniel Chien from Taiwan

Emma Nielsen from Denmark

Nico Suarez Toloza from Colombia

Eric Kwun from South Korea
Wanzita Ally from Tanzania
Matteo Lombardo, Italy

Our 2016-17 outbound students are:

Sage Brinton, Argentina

McKenna Dale, Brazil

Caroline Hummel, Norway

Noah Klein, South Korea

Jane Ludwig, Colombia

Yizel Marcial, Germany

Daiki Nishioka, Taiwan

Liliana (Lily) Noble, Italy

Madison Peterson-Bradford, Brazil

Emma Pritchard, Taiwan

Nathaniel Urke, Brazil.

Coming Up

October 6 — Bruce Morlan, Classified.

October 13 — Mike Strobel, The Making of Aurora Pharmaceuticals (Reese)

October 20 — Melanie Freeze, Carleton College, “What’s Ahead in the Election” (Holden)

October 27 — Breanna Wheeler, River Bend Nature Center’s New Start (Madigan)

Categories: Organizations

Pulling together for Northfield! CANCELLED DUE TO HIGH WATER!

Northfield Public Library - Kids Info - Tue, 09/20/2016 - 10:51am
Could you pull a 6,000-pound truck filled with Northfield area leaders? Probably not. But if we pull together with a clear goal in mind, Northfield Area United Way believes we can move just about anything – or anyone – forward, no matter how weighty.Northfield  Area United Way is asking locals to demonstrate the power of pulling together during its fall campaign launch. Teams will attempt to pull a giant Ford truck filled with area leaders representing the Northfield area from just inside Fifth St. to Bridge Square along Water St. from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 22. The team pulling the truck the distance the fastest will win. The United Way Truck Pull is sponsored by Dokmo Ford-Chrysler, which also is providing the truck.Leaders in the truck will include Northfield Mayor Dana Graham; City Administrator Ben Martig; Police Chief Monte Nelson; City of Northfield’s Director of Library and IT Services Teresa Jenson; and Northfield City Council Members Jennifer Peterson White, Rhonda Pownell and Erica Zweifel.Leaders from all areas served by the Northfield Area United Way have been invited to participate, including officials from Dundas, Dennison, Lonsdale, Kilkenny, Lonsdale, Montgomery and Webster.KYMN’s Jeff Johnson will emcee the event.Teams that want to compete to pull the truck are forming now. If you would like to field a team, contact the Northfield Area United Way, 507-664-3510 or connect@northfieldunitedway.org. The number of teams is limited, so register your team as soon as possible.The public is encouraged to cheer on teams and join in an ice cream social. Ice cream and Jonny Pops are free, complements of Upper Lakes Foods and Jonny Pops.
Categories: Organizations

What was once lost is found!

Northfield Public Library - Kids Info - Tue, 09/20/2016 - 9:54am

The Josiah Edson Chapter Daughters of the American RevolutionInvites you to a special Dedication Ceremony
Saturday, September, 24, 2016 at 10 am
The Story:Originally dedicated on May 7, 1932, the bronze plaque and a Washington Elm tree were a gift to the Northfield Carnegie Library given by Josiah Edson Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution. After the death of the tree, the plaque went into storage and was lost.
Three Iowa women found it at a sale in Iowa and returned the plaque to the Josiah Edson Chapter. Today as we remember those whose work went before us, we rededicate the original plaque and dedicate a Patriot Elm with its own plaque.
Welcome all!
Categories: Organizations

New Officers and New TEEN Book Club starting up!

TABleau (Northfield Public Library) - Mon, 09/19/2016 - 2:14pm
Thank you to everyone who came to the meeting Friday. We got a lot accomplished in a short time. First off, from here on out, the TAB meetings will be on the second Monday of the month at 6pm unless otherwise agreed upon. This seems to fit best with everyone’s schedules.
We will be starting a monthly teen book club. I will be working with our new officers to create a list of books and from there we will have a TAB-wide vote to choose.
TAB will also be taking over the display on the teen table in the YA area of the library. Each month a different person will be in charge of designing and setting up the display. There will be a sign-up sheet incoming.
I have created a Facebook group for the TAB that I will invite everyone who submits their TAB application to join. This will be a good way for us all to communicate and easily discuss issues and plans. If you don’t have a Facebook page, I would encourage you to create one, even if it’s just for TAB.
Lastly, because it’s fun to string you along, we voted on our officers at Friday’s meeting and the results are below. Thanks again to everyone who ran.
President: Cynthia TerryVice-President: Dylan Coutermash
Secretary: Olivia Felland
TAB Advisor Ian Holmes
Categories: Organizations

Support Save Our Services – Increase Medicaid Funding

Laura Baker Services Association - Thu, 09/15/2016 - 4:38pm

Alongside partners, like American Network of Community Options and Resources (ANCOR), LBSA supports individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their caregivers. Part of this commitment means being active constituents who seek legislative support and advocate for change. One way we can do this is by reaching out to elected officials who have the power to support legislation that affects the people we serve.

What is the Save Our Services (SOS) Campaign?

The SOS campaign seeks to convince Congress to grant a temporary increase in federal Medicaid funding for providers of intellectual and developmental disability community services, like LBSA!

The most recent regulatory change being addressed is the Department of Labor’s (DOL) revision of the overtime exemption rule, which will increase the salary that employees must receive in order to be exempt from overtime requirements. Medicaid rates have remained stagnant or decreased during the past decade, while demand for community services has increased. Without increased reimbursement, we cannot fairly compensate our caregivers for their tremendous work and be in compliance with the federal overtime rules while ensuring the same high-quality services.

What Can be Done?

By temporarily increasing Medicaid funding for providers, organizations like Laura Baker Services Association and others can continue to provide the highest level of service to our clients while fairly compensating caregivers for their tremendous work and ensuring that we comply with federal overtime rules.

We are asking Congress to provide a lifeline that will enable disability services providers to keep service quality stable and to help them comply with the DOL’s revision of the overtime exemption rule, while advocates seek to permanently increase Medicaid rates.

This can be done through their support of the Disability Community Act of 2016 (H.R. 5902), a bill that will provide a three-year, targeted and temporary funding bump to providers so that they can comply with new federal rules not funded under current fixed Medicaid rates.

Be an Active Constituent

We need your voice! Take two minutes and write a letter to your lawmaker in support of the Disability Community Act of 2016!

 

The post Support Save Our Services – Increase Medicaid Funding appeared first on Laura Baker Services Association.

Categories: Organizations

Rotary Cogwheel | 09.15.2016

Northfield Rotary Club - Tue, 09/13/2016 - 3:35pm

Today’s Program | Thursday, Sept. 15, 2016

Today: ENT Gerard O’Halloran, MD, “What I Wish My Patients Knew” (Spethmann)

Birthdays: Kate Andrew (9/14), Chris Weber (9/15) and Daniel Chien (9/20)

Next Week: Patrick Donahue, James J. Hill Center (K. Hargis)

Last Week:
Bike tour chalk talk: We came, we ate, we organized.

Check Presentation:|
Judy O’Fallon, a member of the district’s grant committee, presented a check for $4,738 in support of the dormitory bed project for a girls’ school in Tanzania. She praised the club’s stellar work in both youth exchange and grants.

Guests: Ramiz Allawala (Allawala), Robert Schulte (Schulte), Judy O’Fallon (V. Dilley) and a legion of auxiliary bike tour volunteers.

Announcements:
Please check the online directory to see if everything is up to date.  Let President Lasswell know if there are changes to be made.

Like us on Facebook. Jean Wakely encouraged club members to use Facebook to promote club activities such as the bike tour on an ongoing basis. Like the Rotary page and share it with those in your orbit.

If you took some good pictures of the bike tour or craft fair last weekend, e-mail them to Virginia Kaczmarek. We’ll use them on our website and Facebook page to better tell our story.

Members of the intrepid Turkey Trot Committee refuse to stand still. This year they are adding a new wrinkle to boost participation and our net dollars. It’s called the “Wild Turkey Trot.” The plan is to use social media to encourage all of our friends and supporters, especially exchange student alumni, to participate long distance if they cannot physically be in town for Thanksgiving. People can sign up online (rotary.org/events/turkeytrot) and for $20 receive an event T-shirt in the mail prior to the event. They will be encouraged to take a photo or video which will be shared on our website. These will be viewed and voted on by the masses and a prize awarded for the wildest “Wild Turkey Trot.”

Cannon River Watershed Partnership (CRWP) will hold a river cleanup this Saturday. We are sending a party to Cannon Falls for the day. See Jake Conway if you can help.

Inbound students are:
Daniel Chien from Taiwan

Emma Nielsen from Denmark

Nico Suarez Toloza from Colombia

Eric Kwun from South Korea
Wanzita Ally from Tanzania
Matteo Lombardo, Italy

Our 2016-17 outbound students are:

Sage Brinton, Argentina

McKenna Dale, Brazil

Caroline Hummel, Norway

Noah Klein, South Korea

Jane Ludwig, Colombia

Yizel Marcial, Germany

Daiki Nishioka, Taiwan

Liliana (Lily) Noble, Italy

Madison Peterson-Bradford, Brazil

Emma Pritchard, Taiwan

Nathaniel Urke, Brazil.

Coming Up

September 29 — Joe Wakely, Clean Drinking Water in Guatemala (Halverson)

October 6 — Bruce Morlan, Classified.

October 13 — Mike Strobel, The Making of Aurora Pharmaceuticals (Reese)

October 20 — Melanie Freeze, Carleton College, “What’s Ahead in the Election” (Holden)

Categories: Organizations

Michi

Northfield Arts Town - Mon, 09/12/2016 - 11:10am

Michi – Distinctive Paths Shared Affinity

An Exhibition of Japanese American Ceramic Artists

Curated by Yoshi Fujii and Juliane Shibata

The Michi exhibit is supported by the Embassy of Japan in the United States of America and was presented at the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts (NCECA) 50th annual conference in March 2016. The show is sponsored by the Baltimore Kawasaki Sister City Committee, Perlman Teaching Museum at Carleton College, Robert M. MacNamara Foundation, Towson University, and private donors. The Carleton exhibit is presented with generous support from Pamela Kiecker Royall ’80 and William A. Royall Jr.

 

SEPTEMBER 16 — NOVEMBER 16, 2016 | KAEMMER FAMILY GALLERY

Perlman Teaching Museum in the Weitz Center for Creativity, Carleton College

Categories: Organizations

Watch this!

TABleau (Northfield Public Library) - Fri, 09/09/2016 - 8:24am

Categories: Organizations

Find out why WCCO TV was here Wednesday morning---

TABleau (Northfield Public Library) - Wed, 09/07/2016 - 2:54pm
If you want to know you will have to watch the 10 pm news on channel 4 on Thursday, Sept. 8th.


Categories: Organizations

Find out why WCCO TV was here Wednesday morning-

Northfield Public Library - Kids Info - Wed, 09/07/2016 - 2:51pm

 Watch WCCO channel 4 at 10 pm on Thursday, Sept. 8th to find out why!


Categories: Organizations

Rotary Cogwheel | 09.08.2016

Northfield Rotary Club - Wed, 09/07/2016 - 8:59am

Today’s Program | Thursday, Sept. 8, 2016

Today: Bike Tour Volunteers and Chalk Talk

Birthdays: Chris Richardson (9/6) and Therese Whitesong (9/9)

Next Week: ENT Gerard O’Halloran, MD, “What I Wish My Patients Knew” (Spethmann)

Last Week:
Each year eight to 10 Northfield eighth grade students have the opportunity to explore Northfield history through a program called Student Community Outreach Program Experience (SCOPE).

Coordinator Earl Weinmann, a Middle School Social Studies teacher, said this is an educational collaboration between Northfield Public Schools, Northfield Historical Society and Carleton College History Department which dates back to 1992. Over time, students have produced a third-grade text book on Northfield History, titled “Our Story;” created a Museum of Northfield Education at the middle school; and written a comprehensive history of Northfield through 1976.

Now, SCOPE students have turned their attention to local immigration patterns. Through interviews and research the students are shedding light on the “push-pull” factors that have attracted 26,000 Vietnamese and 67,000 Mexicans to Minnesota since the 1970s.

Northfield, itself, sponsored some 121 Vietnamese families between 1975 and 1999 through Northfield Refugee Committee. Many immigrants from Maltrata, Mexico now call Northfield home.

These migrations have had implications for Northfield. Northfield Community Action Center started a Hispanic Project in 1991 to provide basic resource help to immigrants new to Northfield. St. Dominic’s has supported Mexican families with Spanish masses. English as a Second Language (ESL) program was introduced into Northfield schools in 1995.

The students have also wrestled with concepts of both overt and covert discrimination and the tension between assimilation and ethnic pride. They suggest the time-honored metaphor of the American “melting pot” or “salad” should give way to the notion of a rich, flavorful fondue.

For more on the student research, stop in at the Northfield Historical Society.

 

Mini-Classification:
Leo Lawlor came to Northfield from Ames, Iowa seven years ago.  He had been a media coordinator and speech specialist in the school system there for 30 years.  He is happy to call Northfield home now.


Guests:
The Rev. Pam Fickenscher of St. John’s Lutheran Church (Weber), our exchange students: Emma, Denmark; Nico, Columbia; Ally, Tanzania (Lasswell).

Scholarship Enhancement: Jack Hoschauer

Announcements:
President Lasswell encouraged us to check our  online directory to see if everything is up to date.  Let her know if there are changes to be made.

As of last week, 300 riders had pre-registered for the bike tour. This is on par with last year, but trails our high water mark of 2014.  Committee chair Chris Heineman said two-thirds of these riders are signed up for the 60 or 100 mile routes.  He invited us to “like” the bike tour on Facebook to add to our promotion.

Charlie Cogan’s  article on the progress to eradicate polio appeared in the Star Tribune on September 2.

Jean Wakely encouraged club members to use Facebook to promote club activities such as the bike tour on an ongoing basis. She also announced that we have a new box of flags to take on trips to other states and countries where you would be attending a Rotary meeting.  Use the club finder or Rotary.org to find a club on your travels.

We need three or four more volunteers to help with the Rotary Ethics Workshop Tuesday, Oct. 25. See David Koenig if you can help.

Cannon River Watershed Partnership (CRWP) will hold a river cleanup Saturday, Sept. 17. Work will be done at three sites — Sechler Park, Carleton College’s Cowling Arboretum and Riverside Park in Cannon Falls — beginning at 9 a.m. All volunteers are invited to a post-cleanup celebration at Bay Point Park in Red Wing at 3 p.m. where there will be bluegrass music and food. If you can help, see Jake Conway.

Members of the intrepid Turkey Trot Committee refuse to stand still. This year they are adding a new wrinkle to boost participation and our net dollars. It’s called the “Wild Turkey Trot.” The plan is to use social media to encourage all of our friends and supporters, especially exchange student alumni, to participate long distance if they cannot physically be in town for Thanksgiving. People can sign up online (rotary.org/events/turkeytrot) and for $20 receive an event T-shirt in the mail prior to the event. They will be encouraged to take a photo or video which will be shared on our website. These will be viewed and voted on by the masses and a prize awarded for the wildest “Wild Turkey Trot.”

Mike Leming announced the celebrated storyteller Kevin Kling will performing Saturday evening, Oct. 28, at Northfield High School for a fundraiser that will benefit Interact Center for the Visual and Performing Arts. Interact is national leader in creating art opportunities for artists with disabilities. Tickets are $25 and available at klingnf.org.

Our 2016-17 outbound students are:

Sage Brinton, Argentina

McKenna Dale, Brazil

Caroline Hummel, Norway

Noah Klein, South Korea

Jane Ludwig, Colombia

Yizel Marcial, Germany

Daiki Nishioka, Taiwan

Liliana (Lily) Noble, Italy

Madison Peterson-Bradford,  Brazil

Emma Pritchard, Taiwan

Nathaniel Urke, Brazil.

Coming Up

September 22 — Patrick Donahue, James J. Hill Center (K. Hargis)

September 29 — Joe Wakely, Clean Drinking Water in Guatemala (Halverson)

October 6 — Bruce Morlan, Classified.

October 13 — Mike Strobel, The Making of Aurora Pharmaceuticals (Reese)

September  1, 2016 Rotary Meeting Minutes

  • Song:  The Rouser (with Gopher and Raider verses)
  • Guests:  Exchange Students …;

Pr. Pam Fickensher (Weber)

  • Mini Classification SCOPE
    • Earl Weinmann:  SCOPE started in 1992 with the support of then superintendent Charlie Kyte.  Thank you to Charlie, Matt Hillman and Chris Richardson for their support of the program.  SCOPE is a collaboration between the Northfield Public Schools, Northfield Historical Society, and Carleton College’s History Department.  Each year, a small group of about 5-10 eighth graders are selected to participate in SCOPE.The initial project for SCOPE was to write a comprehensive history of Northfield through 1976 when the Historical Society was founded.  That project finished up in 2015, so they needed to find a new focus for the 2015-16 school year and beyond.   Students this year adopted a new focus on Vietnamese and Mexican immigrants in Northfield.
    • The SCOPE group started by discussing  a number of push and pull factors that caused approximately 26000 Vietnamese and 67000 Mexicans to immigrate to Minnesota.  A push factor is something in their home country that encouraged them to leave, usually political and economic or both.  Pull factors, such as the American Dream, higher paying jobs, or education, are factors that encouraged them to come to this country and Northfield.
    • The SCOPE group interviewed several immigrants and community members involved with those communities about their experiences.
    • Vietnamese immigration happened in three waves:  the military in 1975, the boat people in 1976, and the extended families of those groups as well as families and children of servicemen afterward.
    • They noted that transition, especially climate, can be difficult.
    • The SCOPE group discussed a number of issues related to community and culture with respect to Vietnamese and Mexican immigrants in Northfield.
      • The school district introduced  their ESL (English as a Second Language) program in 1995 which continues today.  ESL is helpful, but it has its flaws, such as taking students away from the mainstream curriculum causing them to fall behind in other areas.  Sometimes, stereotypes developed that cause placement into ESL simply because a name is of Mexican origin, even though the child speaks fluent English.
      • Immigrant rights groups sprouted up in the community in 1995 as a result of INS raids.
      • The Northfield Refugee Committee  sponsored 121 Vietnamese from 1975-1999.  The NRC was sponsored by 8 churches and finally disbanded when they felt there services were no longer needed.
      • The Community Action Center started their Hispanic Project in 1991 to provide food, clothing, and housing to immigrants in Northfield.
      • St Dominic’s helped sustain the Mexican community and culture by providing 4 masses in 2 different languages.  This helps sustain the Mexican community, but also separates the white community from the Mexican community.
    • The SCOPE group emphasized the importance of family in both groups.
      • Maintaining family is important to Mexicans.  They often support family both in the US and in Mexico.
      • A large number of the Mexican community in Northfield came from Maltrata, Mexico.
      • 50 members of Dao Hella’s family resettled in Northfield.  Dao was a primary interviewee for the group.
      • They like to maintain traditions, especially food and holidays.
    • Assimilation and Americanization
      • There can be discrimination for assimilating and not assimilating.
      • An example of overt discrimination is excluding an individual from an event.
      • An example of covert discrimination is not accepting a person on a team.  This is passive discrimination and sometimes not verbal.
      • Segregation is still prevalent.  Mexican immigrants do not feel safe downtown, so they often stay in the area of Viking Terrace.
      • The language barrier is an obstacle for Mexican immigrants.  Masses are segregated at St Dominic’s.  They often are afraid to speak because they don’t want to feel stupid.
      • The Northfield Refugee Committee was helpful to the Vietnamese overcome their language barriers and being a segregated community.
    • The SCOPE group told us to think of the traditional American melting pot where you give into American culture and become an American.  They also told us to think of a salad bowl where there are different vegetables doing their own thing and keeping their flavors (i.e. –  their traditions).  Rather than try to fit being a melting pot or a salad bowl, they suggested the immigrant community currently and in the future should be considered Fondue!  That is, a mix of both traditional flavor and that from the pot.
    • Mr. Weinmann said there if we were more interested in the subject of Vietnamese and Mexican immigrants, there is more available at the Northfield Historical Society.
Categories: Organizations

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Northfield Public Library - Kids Info - Tue, 09/06/2016 - 4:57pm
Rain, rain go away!
Categories: Organizations

Studio ARTour

Northfield Arts Town - Tue, 09/06/2016 - 6:30am

Studio ARTour presents the 2016 Studio ARTour, a FREE self-guided tour featuring 40 artists, 21 studios, demonstrations and a unique opportunity for the public to visit with the artists and see them at work in their creative workspaces. The tour will take place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, October 15 and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday, October 16; some studios will also be open from 4 to 8 p.m. on Friday, October 14.

 

In its 12th year, the annual Studio ARTour is a fun-filled weekend event that highlights the diverse art scene in South Central Minnesota, including Northfield, Faribault and surrounding area. Every year, dozens of artists participate in the tour attracting hundreds of visitors during its two-day run, answering visitor questions and providing demonstrations of their art-making process. The Studio ARTour features mediums ranging from weaving to welding, glass to gemstones, clay to carvings (with original work available for purchase), and is lauded as a premiere art event in Minnesota and beyond.

 

“These studio tours are a wonderful way to really get to know the artists, to see their processes, the mediums they use, the personal spaces where they create, and to understand how all of it helps define their art,” says co-chair Judy Saye-Willis.

 

Tour Maps can be obtained from the Studio ARTour website.

 

Updates about the event will be posted on the following social media sites:

 

ABOUT

The Studio ARTour is a co-operative venture among a group of artists in the areas around Farmington, Northfield, and Faribault. For more information, visit http://www.studioartour.com.

Categories: Organizations

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