Citizens

And in the Alaska Highway News…

Carol Overland - Legalectric - Mon, 08/03/2015 - 11:26pm


They published my LTE in the Alaska Highway News:

UTILITY INFRASTRUCTURE LEAVES DEEP IMPACTS

Your coverage of the RCMP shooting of James McIntyre has been thorough in this general dearth of information.

I’ve spent the last 20 years advocating against utility infrastructure in the U.S., and the killing of McIntyre by RCMP is horrifying.  

A big part of my schtick is to stand at the door (not inside where I’d be “interfering”) and enthusiastically greet everyone, hand them a flyer about how to participate, and direct them to the meeting.  Had I been at that open house, I’d be the one they found at the door.  Had they told me to leave, I’d have argued and resisted, as always, ramping up if they pushed.

In my experience, utilities have now and then requested police presence, and when I see it, I let the organizers know it’s offensive and off putting, chilling public participation.  People have a right to speak out against a project, and they have a right to be angry!  I talk to the officers too, find out if I can who wanted them there, and let them know it’s inhibiting and threatening to the public.  I figure they just add me to their list of people to watch.  But this atmosphere of blind fear is not acceptable.  Don’t Canadians have a right to free speech?  Civil disobedience is an appropriate response.  Civil disobedience is NOT a death sentence with law enforcement as judge, jury and executioner.

People are being steam-rolled by utility infrastructure projects such as dams, transmission lines, and pipelines, and no one wants to hear about it.  They want opposition to just go away.  People are losing their land, communities are deeply affected, and those affected are not compensated sufficiently to make it acceptable — and money is not the answer to everything!  

Is the Site C project worth the impacts?  Is generating electricity and profiting from it sufficient reason to inflict these impacts, including this death?  Maybe BC Hydro should think again.

—Carol A. Overland, Utility Regulatory Attorney, Minnesota

Categories: Citizens

We're in Luck!

Myrna CG Mibus - Idyllwild - Mon, 08/03/2015 - 9:33pm
We're in Luck, Wisconsin this evening instead of Superior and we feel lucky to be here!
We had breakfast at a little cafe in Siren this morning and were on the Gandy Dancer Trail heading north by 9:00. The going was somewhat slow but the crushed limestone trail was good and we made Danbury by 11:00. We had lunch then I bought some fudge and made a comment to the lady in the fudge shop that we were heading to Superior. When she figured out we were on bikes she got worried and told us the trail turned into an ATV trail and said the trail wasn't good for bikes. We knew that to some degree  - but have never seem ATV trails so didn't know what to expect. We had done as much online research as we could but still didn't know how the trail would work for our bikes. We just knew we had a long 50 miles ahead of us to make Superior and that there were basically no towns in between. Well, we got on the trail and soon discovered why the fudge shop lady was worried. The trail north of Danbury was great for ATVs, somewhat possible on a fatbike but impossible on my Vaya. Owen said my back wheel was skidding all over. The trail was made up of deep sand and gravel and there were no packed sections in which to ride. We rode less than a mile and decided to turn back. Turning back was a good call. We decided to bike the trail south back through Siren and bike until we got tired. 
After an hour, we stopped for a coffee at a great little coffee shop in Webster, Wisconsin. Then we bikes on through Siren on the well maintained trails through Burnett County. Then we hit Polk County and trail conditions changed and were not so nice.
Mostly, the trails were mossy and not well kept up but rideable enough but I hit a few spots of deep sand that I almost wiped out on. Scary. After almost 54 miles of riding total for the day, we decided to stop for the night in Luck, Wisconsin. 
Our hotel, The Luck Country Inn, is nice. We had a good dinner at the Bon Ton tavern (they have a great outdoor patio).
Tomorrow, we will likely ride the trail all the way south to St. Croix Falls then ride back north to Siren. That's the plan, anyway. As we learned today, plans can always change!
We're both tired but are feeling strong. Our bikes and gear are working great. We are having fun and are probably eating too much! Good night. 
Categories: Citizens

Clean Power Plan? MPCA wants comments!

Carol Overland - Legalectric - Mon, 08/03/2015 - 2:37pm

That’s the Coal Creek plant, a photo I took on a tour.  If you’re an electric co-op member in Minnesota (elsewhere too?), they offer tours regularly, and it’s something you should do!  Check your co-op’s newsletter for info.

State Register Notice:

MPCA_StateRegister_Pages from 40_05

Just released FEDERAL Clean Power Plan:

Clean Power Plan Final Rule (PDF)(1560 pp, 3.3 MB, About PDF) – August 2015

Look at how the “adjusted” Minnesota’s baseline levels due to Sherco 3 being out for nearly 2 years:

The EPA examined units nationwide with 2012 outages to determine where an individual unit-level outage might yield a significant difference in state goal computation. When applying this test to all of the units informing the computation of the BSER, emission performance rates, and statewide goals, the EPA determined that the only unit with a 2012 outage that 1) decreased its output relative to preceding and subsequent years by 75 percent or more (signifying an outage), and 2) could potentially impact the state’s goal as it constituted more than 10 percent of the state’s generation was the Sherburne County Unit 3 in Minnesota.  The EPA therefore adjusted this state’s baseline coal steam generation upwards to reflect a more representative year for the state in which this 900 MW unit operates.

Clean Power Plan Final Rule (PDF p. 796 of 1560).

And from the state, which acknowledges imminent release of FEDERAL Clean Power Plan Final Rule , also released today, just in from the MPCA (direct quote):

The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) has issued a request for comments on possible rule amendments to bring Minnesota into compliance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Clean Power Plan. You can read the full request in the August 3, 2015, edition of the State Register, available at www.comm.media.state.mn.us/bookstore/mnbookstore.asp?page=register.

The amendments we are considering will help Minnesota meet standards established by the Clean Power Plan, which sets state-specific carbon dioxide emission targets and requires each state to submit a plan detailing its strategy for meeting the targets. As of State Register press time, we have not yet started drafting a plan because the EPA has not yet published the standards that Minnesota’s plan will need to meet, so the MPCA requests public input to help guide our considerations of methods for meeting the EPA’s targets, as well as any other objectives that the state’s plan might include.

Stakeholder meeting agendas, notes, and other related documents are posted on the website for this rulemaking at www.pca.state.mn.us/w9y3awr.

To access information about a particular Minnesota rulemaking, visit the Public Rulemaking Docket.

 

Categories: Citizens

Safe and sound in Siren

Myrna CG Mibus - Idyllwild - Sun, 08/02/2015 - 8:03pm
Well we are safe and sound in Siren, Wisconsin and have finished day 1 of our bike packing adventure. 

We took off from Shell Lake just before 4 p.m. and headed west on county road B for Siren. At mile 3.5 Owen got stung by a bee or something so we stopped to check him out. Owen reacts terribly to mosquito bites so I was quite worried he'd swell up and have an allergic reaction. But he didn't, thank goodness. We biked on. 
We had about a 15 mph headwind all the way to Siren. That was a bummer but we managed. The ride went well. The scenery was beautiful. 
After 2 1/2 hours (27.8 miles) of biking we rolled into Siren. We're staying at a little motel, the Pinewood Motel, and we're having dinner right now at the Pour House. 

My foot is a little sore. Other than that, I'm feeling strong. 
Planning on 70 miles (Owen says it's all downhill) tomorrow. 
Categories: Citizens

It's almost Go Time!

Myrna CG Mibus - Idyllwild - Sat, 08/01/2015 - 9:37pm
Tomorrow Owen and I take off on our bike packing adventure. We are mostly packed but will finish up in the morning. We have some time as we are not due to drop our son off at camp until 1:30 p.m. at the earliest. It's likely we'll leave our home for Shell Lake, Wisconsin around 10 a.m. and be biking by mid-afternoon.

At present, our plan is to bike 30 miles to Siren on Sunday afternoon and overnight there. We talked about biking to Danbury, another 10 miles further north, but I could not find a non-smoking hotel room open (at a reasonable price) at the local casino hotels. It's not that we are really picky about non-smoking vs. smoking rooms but that combined with the fact that we have just a few hours to get anywhere on Sunday made us decide we'd bike a shorter distance on our first day. Seems less stressful.

On Monday we plan to bike about 70 miles all the way to Superior. We'd make it a shorter day except that hotels appear to be scarce along the Gandy Dancer Trail so we'll just make a day of it and pedal away.

Once we're in Superior, we overnight then Tuesday morning head back south again for Shell Lake. I think we can make Shell Lake in two days of about 50 miles a day. If not, we'll take longer. We have an extra day built in as we don't have to be back in Shell Lake to get Ryan until Thursday.

I'm a bit stressed about carrying everything on my bike but I think I have things under control. I packed all of my clothes and some toiletries and a book to read (Neil Gaimon's The Ocean at the End of the Lane) all in my Pika seat bag. It weighs about five pounds and I still have room to spare. I'll finish packing a first aid kit, some other toiletries and some food in my handlebar bag tomorrow morning.

Tonight, Owen and I took the bikes out for a little test ride around the neighborhood with our seat bags all packed. The bikes rode great even with extra weight hanging off their back ends. In theory, we should have biked a lot longer and tested things out even better. But, oh well, we didn't. We'll be fine.

Here we are with our bikes packed and almost ready to go!I'm feeling pretty excited about our upcoming adventure! I've wanted to go on a bike packing trip for well over a year now and I'm so glad we are making it happen!

I feel excited about something else, too. This morning Owen and I rode the 25 mile route of the Tour de SAVE charity bike ride that raises money and awareness for suicide awareness and education. We've done the SAVE ride several years and are glad to help raise money for SAVE. The weather was perfect for the ride this morning and the attendance was good - I don't know how many rode, maybe 60? I met some great people and enjoyed myself immensely.

I feel doubly good about the ride because 1) we helped raise money for a great cause and 2) I, for the first time ever, rode 25 miles without taking a break. Normally on a ride of 20 or so miles I stop and rest about 10 miles in. Today, I felt great and just kept on pedaling.

After riding so well this morning, I'm feeling pretty confident about being able to ride strong this week.

I'll write as often as I can to keep you up to date on our bike adventure!
Categories: Citizens

Why all the fuss about Cecil?

Carol Overland - Legalectric - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 7:02pm

Photo by Brent Stapelkamp

Yes, this whole Cecil thing does bother me.  I’ve seen a lot of criticism of people posting about Cecil when there are so many other awful things going on in the world these days.  But it’s not binary. And it’s not about “hunting,” because dragging an elephant as bait to lure a protected animal out of its sanctuary, wounding it with a bow and arrow and not tracking it immediately and not ending its suffering until 40 hours later, that is not hunting. And there’s also an interest curve, things pop and wane.  There are trends though about those who are making public waves about this.

Another issue, think about Palmer’s choice when he learned that he’d injured and then killed a protected lion. His response was not to contact authorities and report the dead lion. Instead it was to behead and skin him and take those “trophies.” That moment he had a choice, he blew it. Since then, he’s hidden, sent out messages avoiding his responsibility, and not until the shitstorm hit did he acknowledge his actions. This is indicative of his moral compass and code, and consistent with prior acts of poaching and sexual harassment.

I’ve had some time now to consider what shows up in my computer… Of those of us who are commenting on Cecil, we can be concerned about many issues at once, we MUST be concerned about many issues at once.  Most of the people I’ve seen posting about Cecil are activist sorts, people also standing up for equal rights, those who worked for gay marriage, an end to police shootings and abuse, prosecution of bank fraud and rabid capitalism, sex trafficking, homelessness, essentially, demonstrating that we need to pay attention to all these issues for anything to change.  We can and will be concerned about many, many things.  Cecil will be high on the “interest curve” for a while and then we’ll be following the Ray Tensing trail, and then there’s the four Clean Line transmission proposals trying to steamroll their way through state and federal scrutiny. On the other hand, those who are not commenting about Cecil are the same ones not standing up about all things political, ethical, and illegal. I’m noticing the silence. Will watch this over time and see if this hypothesis holds!

The Science of why you are so upset about Cecil the Lion

Bottom line:

Small writes that “most humans are… not just ignorant of but indifferent to almost all of the species on the planet.” In fact, people are “biophobic” meaning they are “slightly to extremely negative towards the majority of species they encounter.”

My issue here is that this is such a blatant case of narcissism on parade, a demonstration of white male privilege in the extreme:

This guy is a privileged white male dentist who pays out more money than most of us make in a year to go around the world and kill beautiful rare animals and bring pieces of them home and display on his walls.   Oh, and he wants to convince us that he’s Putin II.  Oh, please…  urp… Well, then again, considering what we know of Putin, perhaps there are similarities.

N-A-R-C-I-S-S-I-S-M

As a part of his sentence, I’d like to see it include restitution of all he’s paid for this “hunting” to animal sanctuaries; that he must photograph in the wild each of the animals he’s listed as having killed, whether by his “hunting groups” or in criminal records (yes, go photograph a bear); that he face a public (and protected) public shaming; that he get a psych evaluation and follow the recommendation; that he lost his dentistry license for ethical breeches/unethical breaches.

That’s a start.

Here’s the Board of Dentistry’s Settlement regarding the sexual harassment claim against him in 2009 (note it is expressly not “Disciplinary Action”):

Walter Palmer_Agreement for Corrective Action – MN Board of Dentistry

And on NPR (I’d write that headline a bit different… “hunter?” … maybe just “Walt, call home!”):

U.S. Authorities Can’t Find Hunter Who Killed ‘Cecil the Lion’

Let’s keep on this guy… and let’s keep on all the other issues we care about, stop the Clean Line, all four of them, keep demonstrating at the Mall of America, jump up and with with glee as they shut down sand mines in the Driftless area, and run “Greenmark Solar” out of Red Wing!

Categories: Citizens

Xcel Energy admits “growth” is down

Carol Overland - Legalectric - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 5:54pm

Xcel Energy’s 2nd quarter call was this morning.

Xcel Energy (XEL) Benjamin G. S. Fowke on Q2 2015 Results – Earnings Call Transcript

From the Seeking Alpha transcript, a cute tidbut:

The decline in residential sales is driven by lower customer usage. We believe this trend is due to a combination of factors including appliance efficiency, conservation efforts, and an increase in multi-unit dwellings. We have adjusted our annual electric sales guidance to reflect year-to-date results, which lowers our expected growth rate for 2015 to about 0.5%.

Got that?

0.5%

That’s a ways away from the 2.49% upon which the CapX 2020 transmission build-out was based.  DOH!

And about multi-year plans and why they “underperformed,” there was this snippet on the Seeking Alpha transcript:

And I think if you look at why we’ve under-earned, we’ve had a lot of CapEx going through a funnel. We had to relicense our nuclear plants. We had some challenges there as everyone in the industry did. And we didn’t have a lot of forums to communicate some of those challenges. So it’s not only the mechanisms associated with the legislation in the multi-year plan; it’s kind of what that frees you up to do. And I am optimistic that we will make good progress next year and in the years to come.

And from our friends at Xcel:

2Q 2015 Report_1001200774

And more:

• Xcel Energy Second Quarter 2015 Earnings Report
• Xcel Energy Second Quarter 2015 Earnings Presentation

And for those of you into charts and graphs (from the 2Q 2015 Report_1001200774):

Categories: Citizens

Will Delaware, like Illinois, sue FERC and PJM?

Carol Overland - Legalectric - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 9:00am

PJM’s Plan for Delaware

Sure hope so — they’ve got it coming.  Cost apportionment is a big issue, and for PJM, well, they’d taken their cost apportionment dream to FERC, got the FERC rubber stamp, but it seems they’ve not done a good job of it, according to the Federal Court — that’s old news:

Illinois Commerce Commission v. FERC August 6, 2009

Fast forward to today — turns out Delaware’s Gov. Markell is objecting to costs assessed to Delaware ratepayers, (though I’m not seeing any objection to the project itself coming out of Delaware).  DOH!  He’d better, this project does nothing for Delaware.

Here’s the PJM Planning doc that tells all:

PJM White Paper Artificial Island Project

Note on the first page the statement of need, of why this project is wanted — this is really important:

PJM specified that solution proposals must improve stability margins, reduce Artificial Island MVAR output requirements and address high voltage reliability issues.

So let me get this straight — they’re having stability and reliability issues and PSEG wants to reduce Artificial Island MVAR output requirements, and want to charge Delaware ratepayers for this?  PUH-LEEZE… This is a benefit to PSEG, not Delmarva…

And look what our big-coal friends at ODEC have to say:

ODEC letter regarding Artificial Island 7-29-2015

This project taps into the new line that was built not long ago:

Delaware has no regulation of transmission need or siting — so utilities can pretty much do whatever they want.  Further, it’s a FERC tariff, so the state doesn’t have anything to say about it going into the rates, and cost apportionment.  Great, just great.  So now Markell is objecting?  It’s a little late…

Delaware needs legislation — legislation like a “Power Plant Siting Act” and a legislative requirement of a need determination for whatever infrastructure they think they want.  They need legislation specifying that only Delaware utilities can own and operate transmission in Delaware (see House Bill 387 from the 2014 session).  Here’s what House Bill 387 would have done (It would have been an effective good start, protective of Delaware!), establish that a utility wanting to construct and operate transmission demonstrate NEED!  Here’s the wording, though it would require quite a bit more, and some solid rules, to be effective:

(5)Public utility electric transmission service providers must have a certificate of public convenience and necessity for the construction and operation of any new electric transmission lines operating at 100KV or greater and located in the State or offshore waters and integrated with the State electric transmission grid.In granting such certificate, the Commission shall consider:

a.the need for the proposed transmission line;

b.the impact on the reliability of the transmission grid

c.the long term viability of the public utility proposing the line;

d.the technical engineering and operating expertise of the public utility;

e.the technology and design proposed for the new transmission line; and

f.the economic and safety impact of the proposed transmission line.

Here’s the report about this PJM approval from Jeff Montgomery, News Journal:

Disputed cost-shares remain in plan for new power line

Note this snippet:

PJM officials said regional and federal rules and precedents obliged the organization to assign 99.99 percent of costs to Delmarva’s transmission zone, mostly in Delaware and Maryland.

The total includes the cost of a $146 million power line installation under the Delaware River and $68 million worth of transformer and substation work by Public Service Electric and Gas at the Artificial Island nuclear complex along the Delaware River southeast of Port Penn.

The Delaware Public Service Commission estimated that transmission costs would increase by about 25 percent in Delaware because of the plan.

“For the average residential consumer, monthly electric bills could increase by several dollars. For the average business, the increase may be more significant,” Markell said in his objection. “Some of our heaviest users could see increases of hundreds of thousands of dollars.”

And here’s the schedule for this project going forward from the PJM Board meeting yesterday:

Seems there’s an opportunity before the FERC ALJ.  But before then?  What is Delaware going to do?  Well, take a look at what Illinois did when it didn’t appreciate the FERC Cost Apportionment scheme — they sued FERC and won, based on the notion that if they weren’t benefitting, they shouldn’t be the ones paying:

Illinois Commerce Commission v. FERC August 6, 2009

The FERC Cost Apportionment scheme was remanded, and it’s in settlement negotiations right now.  What is Delaware doing in that docket?  To review the public postings, go HERE and search for FERC Docket EL05-121.  The next settlement conference is Thursday, August 6, 2015, starting at 10:15 a.m. in a hearing room at FERC HQ.  Delaware is represented in this, at least there are Delaware PSC staff listed on the service list, Janis Dillard, John Farber, and Robert Howatt.  So what are they doing about this cost apportionment scheme?  Seems this settlement conference is just the place for raising a stink about the PJM cost apportionment scheme, to raise issues of “benefits” and “cause cost, pay” arguments.  Are they showing up and speaking up for Delaware?

Categories: Citizens

Pennine Way Day 1: Edale to Torside Reservoir

Rob Hardy - Rough Draft - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 8:33am
The Official Start of the Pennine Way
Edale, Derbyshire"The forecast was for showers,” said James, the proprietor of The Old House, the bed and breakfast we reached at the end of the first day. “I suppose that was true. There was one shower that lasted all morning, and another shower that lasted all afternoon.”
Climbing Jacob's Ladder onto the Kinder Scout Plateau
We climbed all morning into cloud. On Jacob’s Ladder, the steep initial ascent from the narrow valley of the River Noe, we passed a group of teenagers participating in the Duke of Edinburgh Award, their bright orange pack covers the only objects visible in the mist. As we reached the top of Jacob’s Ladder and emerged from the lee of the mountain, a steady gale pelted us with cold rain. Past Edale Rocks—a faint shadow in the mist that gradually solidified into a mass of gritstone boulders—I lost the trail and wasn’t sure I had found it again until we reached the trig point on Kinder Low. There was nothing that looked like a path, nothing but boulders and black earth and cloud, nothing to follow but the compass needle.
Edale RocksWe didn’t see another soul until we reached the vicinity of Ashop Head, where the Pennine Way crosses the Snake Path, and a party of half a dozen middle-aged walkers appeared suddenly out of the cloud. The one woman in the group clutched a broken black umbrella over her head.
“Lovely English weather,” one of the men said cheerfully.
For the six days we spent walking on the Pennine Way, the weather was an unfailing topic of conversation. It was one of the central facts of life on the trail. Like the landscape and the blisters and the crowded contour lines on the map, it was part of our shared experience, a basis of our fellowship. We walked in whatever weather the day dished up. We got drenched in the rain, scorched in the sun, and the weather was always either ironically or genuinely lovely.
Hern Clough. We followed Hern Clough upstream for about half a mile,
crossing and recrossing countless times, to reach BleaklowWhen we stopped near Ashop Head, there were still miles of supersaturated peat bogs to cross before we reached the Old House at six in the evening, nine hours after we set out from Edale, just as the clouds were beginning to thin out above Torside Reservoir. 
Torside ReservoirWe were soaked to the skin, and it took a pot of tea and a hot bath to get the chill out of my left shoulder. We had spent the entire day walking in cloud, and although it was disappointing not to have seen any of the views from Kinder Scout, I felt exhilarated. I had made it through the toughest day of the toughest long distance walk in Britain in some of the most challenging conditions. The disappointments were just points on a larger arc of accomplishment.
Warming up in our room at The Old House

Categories: Citizens

SPP Planning: It’s as if Clean Lines don’t exist!

Carol Overland - Legalectric - Tue, 07/28/2015 - 2:49pm

As if they don’t exist?  Yes, and that’s because they don’t.  That’s because they’re transmission projects in their own minds, and not in reality.

What?  SPP, the Southwest Power Pool, dissing Clean Line?  See for yourself!  It’s as simple as doing a simple search of the SPP planning reports.

We know, Clean Line is all about Clean Line, but there’s a significant disconnect between what Clean Line is saying about SPP, claiming “approval” of its projects and incorporation of those projects into SPP’s plans, and the reality of what shows up in those plans.  Or more correctly, what DOESN’T show up in those plans:

CLEAN LINE IS ABSENT!

PLAINS & EASTERN CLEAN LINE IS ABSENT!

GRAIN BELT EXPRESS CLEAN LINE IS ABSENT!

Whadda ya mean?  Well, on November 19, 2012, Plains & Eastern Clean Line sent out this press release:

SPP Transmission Working Group approves Plains & Eastern Clean Line reliability studies

This press release was EVERYWHERE, with Clean Line jubilant, jumping up and down, so excited and so elated, and stated that:

The Southwest Power Pool’s (SPP) Transmission Working Group today unanimously passed a motion accepting that the Plains & Eastern Clean Line reliability studies completed to date have met the coordinated planning requirements.

And went on to say (emphasis added) that:

Clean Line is also pleased to announce that it recently submitted the Plains & Eastern Clean Line and Grain Belt Express Clean Line projects, both +/- 600 kV high voltage direct current transmission projects capable of transmitting 3,500 MW from the SPP footprint to external-to-SPP sinks, in each of the ITP20 Futures 1 through 4. The objective of ITP20 is to develop an EHV backbone (345 kV and above) transmission plan for a 20-year horizon. The assessment will identify a robust transmission plan that is capable of reliably and economically providing deliverability of energy to the SPP market while enabling policy initiatives. The current ITP20 process is the second Integrated Transmission Planning Year 20 Assessment (ITP20). The assessment is conducted in accordance with the SPP Open Access Transmission Tariff (OATT) Attachment O, and the approved ITP Manual. The assessment begins in January 2012 and is scheduled to be finalized in July 2013.

Here’s that 2013 ITP 20:

2013 ITP20 Report – Southwest Power Pool

Now check out the map of their ITP20 projects in this report — do you see either the Plains & Eastern or Grain Belt mentioned above on this map:

Nope, neither do I.  I did a search of the narrative, and “Clean Line” isn’t even mentioned once!

And there are no ITP20s after that 2013 one above, either HERE on the ITP Assessments page or HERE on the ITP20 Documents page!

Oh, OK, so what about the SPP Planning and SPP’s STEP (not unlike the MTEP and RTEP!):

2015_STEP_Report

Do a search — nada… so I tried a search on “transmission” and blew up the computer.  So the search function works and in this report also, there’s no mention of Clean Line whatsoever, be it Plains & Eastern Clean Line or Grain Belt Clean Line or just plain ol’ Clean Line.

And there’s nothing here either:

2014 ITPNT Report

It’s only in the 2015 ITP10 SCOPE that there’s any mention of “Clean Line” and it’s only the Plains & Eastern Clean Line, not both, AND it’s only for sensitivity analysis.  This is not being included as a project, contemplated or promoted.

2015 ITP10 Scope Final MOPC

And in the resulting 2015 ITP10?  A mention in the list of sensitivities, and then three mentions on p. 103:

Final_2015_ITP10_Report_BOD_Approved_012715

And in the SPP 2015 Final Near Term Assessment, not a mention:

Final_2015_ITPNT_Assessment_BOD_Approved

When it comes to the scope of their next ITP10, Clean Line disappears, not even one mention, nada, again, not even an honorable mention as a “sensitivity” in the scope:

2016_ITPNT_Scope

Meanwhile, Illinois is holding “public hearings” that are very limited for what a large project this is, and very odd, considering that there are pending Motions for Reconsideration in this docket (Grain Belt Express Docket #15-0277 online at ICC’s e-docket system at www.icc.illinois.gov).

Public hearings tonight and tomorrow in Illinois:

I’d hope that Illinois, Missouri, Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Tennessee pay attention to this lack of incorporation of any Clean Line project into SPP Planning!

Oh, and of course, the DOE should be paying attention!  Hey Office of Electric Deliverability and Energy Reliability, are you paying attention?

 

Categories: Citizens

I failed Ryan Leech’s 30-Day Wheelie Challenge. Join me as I try again.

Mountain Bike Geezer - Tue, 07/28/2015 - 2:30pm

Last spring when I saw that pro mountain biker and coach Ryan Leech was going to offer an online 30-day course on learning to wheelie, I was thrilled because A) I suck at wheelies; and B) he was going to use an online approach to learning a complex skill similar to what I’ve been doing with my Thick Skull Mountain Bike Skills online instructional courses , ie, many small steps, using exercises and drills, with a multimedia delivery platform.

I started the course back in April when it launched but I quit after about ten lessons. I started having low back pain, something I struggled with years ago but eventually solved (or so I thought) with a special regimen of pilates and yoga called Back RX which I described in this 2013 blog post. I thought my subsequent regimen of kettlebells and free weights (more on this in a future newsletter) would be enough to keep my back in good shape for mountain biking so I quit doing Back RX.

That appears to have been a mistake, because like most geezers, the discs in my back are gradually degenerating with age so exercises that work on my flexibility are just as important as those for strength and endurance. I know, duh, right?

So after a few months of rest and rehab, I’m ready to start the course all over again. I’m psyched because I actually started having some success in that first week. I got to where I could occasionally experience what Ryan calls ‘the float zone.’ See this 15-second video clip of me doing a wheelie (incorrectly, I learned) for 7 or 8 pedal strokes:

Why learn to wheelie? While wheelies are often cited as a fun but mostly useless skill for mountain biking, there is a real-world benefit, according to Ryan: the experience and confidence in holding the float/balance point is a good foundation for doing the same with manuals (coasting wheelies while standing on the pedals), even though it’s a very different skill.

Ryan participates in the course via comment threads attached to each lesson. So when students have questions about a lesson, he’s there to help and everyone benefits from the interaction.

This experience with Ryan’s course has helped convinced me, also for the first time in my life, to become an affiliate. What’s an affiliate? It simply means I earn a commission when someone clicks on a link to Ryan’s course that I provide and purchases it for the same $30 that he charges.

If you’re interested in more about Ryan’s 30-Day Wheelie Challenge, click here to watch his teaser video, get a course overview and sample one of the lessons.

Bonus: You get to join me as a fellow student!

The post I failed Ryan Leech’s 30-Day Wheelie Challenge. Join me as I try again. appeared first on Mountain Bike Geezer.

Categories: Citizens

Vintage Bands are Coming Back

My Musical Family - Joy Riggs - Mon, 07/27/2015 - 9:40pm
If you are free for an hour or two—or the whole day—this Saturday, Aug. 1, I hope to see you at the One Day Vintage Band Festival in downtown Northfield. Twelve community and professional brass bands from Minnesota will perform concerts in Northfield’s Bridge Square, beginning at 9 a.m. and ending at 9 p.m.

The Riverwalk Market Fair will be going between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m., so you can shop for fresh produce, sample delicious pastries and purchase local art while enjoying the live music. Bring sunscreen, a lawn chair, and some cash or a credit card. Although the concerts are free, the goal of the event is to raise money and to generate excitement about next year’s big four-day festival, set for July 28-31, 2016. Please give what you can. With your financial support, we can make the 2016 event the best yet!


Some of the bands appearing this Saturday played at last year’s mini event, and some are new to the VBF. Visit the Vintage Band Festival website for the latest details about participating bands and concert times. You can also read this recent Northfield News article to learn more about the festival.

In addition to the concerts in Bridge Square, you can hear bands at a few other locations during the afternoon and evening. One performance that should be especially moving is the 34th Infantry Division “Red Bull” Band’s 4:30 p.m concert in the Northfield Cemetery. This is the first year that the Red Bulls have joined us, and they are performing in several different configurations, including as the Red Devils Rock Band at the Contented Cow Pub from 8-10 p.m.

If you are interested in volunteering on Saturday, we are still looking for people to help move chairs and stands between concerts. We could also use help at the end of the day, putting away chairs and taking down street barricades. For more information, email vintagebandfestival@gmail.com or call 507-321-1250.
Categories: Citizens

On the Horizon - Bikepacking!

Myrna CG Mibus - Idyllwild - Mon, 07/27/2015 - 5:01pm
Both kids will be at camps next week so Owen and I have a whole week to ourselves. Instead of going on a relaxing vacation, however, we are going to load up our bikes and go on a bikepacking trip!

We don't have a tent, sleeping bags or equipment to make food along the way so we are going to stay at hotels along our route. This sort of bike touring is commonly called "credit card travel" - as in you use your credit card to pay for accommodation and food along the way. That said, we will be packing clothes and other things so will get a taste for what it's like to carry things on our bikes.

Our plan is to drop Ryan off at camp on Sunday in Shell Lake, Wisconsin. We'll leave our van at his camp and bike northwest to Siren where we'll pick up the Gandy Dancer bike trail that goes north along the Minnesota/Wisconsin border. We'll bike that to Superior then take another bike trail from Superior back down to Shell Lake. I figure we'll bike about 200 miles in four to five days (Sunday will be a short day as we won't leave until mid-afternoon. Thursday will be a shorter day as we need to be back in Shell Lake well before evening). I've never been on a multi-day ride so it will be interesting to see how my body holds up!

As for equipment...

Bikes: Owen will be riding his 2013 Salsa Mukluk 2 and I'll be riding my 2013 Salsa Vaya 2. Both bikes have two bottle cages so we'll have two bike bottles each. We'll also have a bike pump on each bike. I have a bike computer on my Vaya. Both bikes will have headlights mounted on the handlebars and we both have clip on tail lights.

Bike Bags in which to carry our stuff: 

  • We purchased Revelate seat bags from Milltown Cycles for both of our bikes to put our clothes in. Owen got a bigger bag than mine because he has more room for it on his Mukluk than I do on my extra small Vaya. The seat bags expand out to carry a ton of stuff! Owen's bag is the Viscacha and mine is the Pika.  
  • We'll both have handlebar bags (not sure of the brands on these - we've had them for ages) for our toiletries and first aid stuff.
  • Owen will carry spare tubes, patch kit and bike gear in a Banjo Brothers frame pack
  • I have a Bontrager "Pro Speed Box" bag that sits on my top tube near my handlebars. My iPhone and some snacks will go in this bag
  • Owen will probably have a Revelate "feed bag" on his Mukluk in which to carry his iPhone and snacks

We brought the bikes inside in the air conditioning so we could try on our new bike bags and check our equipment. Here's Owen's Mukluk (the fat tire bike in the back) and my Vaya

What will we bring?

We've learned to pack light from all of our trips in our little Pacer and, before that, our Christen Eagle (the Eagle had almost no baggage space - I had to fly with a duffle bag between my feet). That said, we'll be packing even lighter for the bike trip.

This is my tentative plan for clothing.

I'll wear:

  • bike shorts (Terry Bella shorts)
  • jersey
  • sports bra
  • Smart Wool socks
  • bike shoes
  • bike gloves - fingerless
  • sunglasses
  • bike helmet

I'll pack:

  • one pair pants that zip off into shorts (Kuhl brand)
  • two short sleeve shirts
  • one lightweight jacket
  • extra pair Smart Wool socks
  • underwear (4 or 5 pair)
  • bra (one that packs flat)
  • sandals
  • extra jersey
  • pajamas (lightweight knee length t-shirt thing - might leave behind depending on space)
We're considering:
  • I'm giving some thought to bringing a swim suit since we'll be surrounded by lakes and I'm sure it would feel good to swim at the end of a long day of biking. But I think the suit will not make it.
  • I'm also giving some thought to bringing a spare pair of bike shorts. That said another option is I'm thinking about bringing some really thin panty liners to stick on my chamois to keep my shorts a bit more hygienic. Not sure on that yet.
  • Owen is wondering if we should bring ponchos for rain. We have some that pack up really small
As for other stuff we'll pack - I don't plan to bring much for personal items. Since we're staying in hotels/motels I can (hopefully) plan on finding soap and shampoo in the room so don't need to pack things like that. I should be able to fit most of my stuff in a quart sized zip-lock baggie.
My Vaya equipped with bagsHere's a tentative list of personal items I'll carry in my handlebar bag:
  • travel toothbrush
  • small tube of toothpaste
  • dental floss
  • small thing of liquid Castile soap
  • spray on hair conditioner (so I can actually comb through my hair after I shower)
  • comb
  • contact lenses (I'm bringing daily disposables)
  • my glasses
  • vitamins/melatonin/ibuprofin
  • maybe some BB cream
  • lip gloss (Burts Bees)
  • Icy Hot
  • maybe a small container of lotion
  • pen & small notebook
  • elastic ankle support (for my left foot - for my plantar fasciitis)
  • racquet ball (also for my left foot - rolling the ball under my arch works out the muscles on the bottom of my foot)

Stuff Owen and I will share that will go in my handlebar bag:
  • sunscreen
  • small thing of aloe vera (for potential sunburn)
  • bug spray (likely some Off wipes I found - easier to pack)
  • hand/body wipes (great for quick clean ups along the trail)
  • Benadryl cream (for bug bites)
  • hand sanitizer (I have a small spray container)
  • a travel towel - most likely bringing. I think it could come in handy
As for other stuff
  • We'll carry some food (meat sticks, Clif bars, nuts) and will purchase these things along the way as they are pretty easy to find in convenience stores
  • I'll bring a container of Nuun electrolyte tablets (tri-berry flavor
  • I like to have Clif Shot bloks on hand (Mountain Berry flavor)
  • several pant leg straps that double as straps to fasten stuff onto our bikes, if need be
  • lightweight bike lock
Well, that's the tentative lineup of equipment, clothing and personal items. We'll pack up our bikes with everything and go on a ride to test everything before we head out on our trip. 
To those of you who bikepack, does it look like we are missing any essential items? Let me know! We still have time to make adjustments before we head out on our trip!




Categories: Citizens

More “What else fits in that parking space?”

Betsey Buckheit - Mon, 07/27/2015 - 12:51pm
Back in March, I posted What else fits in that parking space? with a couple of graphics about what fits in the same amount of space as a car. In real life, I saw this: So, 3 bikes and a tree … Continue reading →
Categories: Citizens

X-Ray Follow up

Myrna CG Mibus - Idyllwild - Fri, 07/24/2015 - 6:06pm
This post was also published on my Writing Space blog as X-Ray Follow up.I figured I should write a quick post to follow up on my X is for X-Ray post to let you all know what’s going on with my heel pain.I went to the podiatrist and have the official diagnosis of Plantar Fasciitis and Peroneal Tendon Injury in my left foot. The bone spur I have in my left heel has likely been growing for several years but probably isn’t contributing much to my heel pain. That said, I’ve been stretching that foot a lot and may have been irritating the tissue around the spur which would contribute to the pain. It’s likely that the root of the pain came from clipping in and out of my bike pedals so I have loosened the tension on my pedals a lot so that clipping in/out is much easier to do. Other than that, I’ve had a tendency to carry my left shoulder higher than my right. I’m not doing that so much now but that might have also caused me to be off balance and put undue pressure on my left side.So, what am I to do? Rest. Ice. Stretches. Wear good shoes. Biking is a fine form of exercise. Yay! In addition to what the doctor ordered, I’m stepping up healing with other care therapies to give myself a better chance of getting back on my feet.I work with a wonderful bodywork person, Shari Setchell of Body Eclectic and have found that she can actually make my pain go away when she does work on the muscles in my leg so I’m seeing her every week or two weeks for awhile. She is also helping me figure out how to keep my body in balance so that I don’t keep having pain. I decided to get back to my chiropractor and have her make sure my back is aligned properly just in case alignment issues have been contributing. My spine was a bit out of whack so am glad I got back in there. I also see an acupuncturist so am having her do both needle work and muscle work on my left foot and leg when I’m in for my regular appointment.The pain in my left heel is not gone but things have improved a lot. I’m optimistic that my heel will heal.
Categories: Citizens

James McIntyre ID’d as man shot by RCMP

Carol Overland - Legalectric - Thu, 07/23/2015 - 9:53am

This killing is very disheartening.  I’m shook.  As one who spends an inordinate amount of time outside the doorway of nearly every utility infrastructure meeting, open house, and hearing, handing out flyers and greeting everyone as the come in (just attended this last round of GNTL, printer not working so no flyers to be handed out!), this killing by RCMP is most disturbing.  When stationed outside meetings, I’ve been told to leave, to stop handing out flyers (pretty revolutionary flyers, too, telling people how to file comments on the records, urging them to show up at hearings), and I’ve been told to get off private property, that’s happened a few times over the years.  And each time I’ve objected, “resisted” following their directions, standing my ground.  I’ve also objected to police presence at these meetings — sometimes they’re called to keep an eye on things (?? exactly what and why??), and admittedly certain people, and I tell the organizers and the officers that I object, and stress that it has a chilling effect on participation.  Now?  Guess I’ll think twice, or maybe three times, about getting vocal when told to leave.

What happened in Dawson Creek?  There was a tweet prior to the meeting saying “Anonymous splinter group (to) attend the scheduled meeting in Dawson Creek tonight starting at 6pm,” (seems to have been deleted?).  One protester attended the open house, and he got rowdy at a meeting, it’s not clear exactly what happened, did he have a mask on or not, but it sounds like he dumped over displays and tore up maps, and then was asked to leave and he did leave the meeting without further hassle.  Meanwhile someone called police.  RCMP arrived on high alert, found a man at the entrance wearing a mask, according to statements, officers presumed it was same one disrupting the open house, they had an agitated back and forth with the man near the door, it’s reported he had a knife, in hand or in case on belt.  RCMP shoots and kills him.  The youtube shows the aftermath.  Photos show a guy with hood up, Guy Fawkes mask on, hands in front of him.  He visibly bled out on the sidewalk.  Initially, it was reported that it was the same guy as was inside the open house, and then, many hours afterwards, they revealed that no, the man who was killed was not the same person who was causing the disturbance at the open house (not that causing a disturbance should be a death sentence), and the one causing the disturbance had left the scene, he was alive and well.  There were also reports that the man shot and killed was involved in an unrelated domestic disturbance in the bar but that has disappeared from reports and appears not to be true.  An apartment was raided, and it seems it was the “disruptors” family’s apartment.

Regional District wants BC Hydro to hit brakes on Site C Site C Dam and Powerplant Not Needed

And let’s not have anymore gatherings about this project for a while, makes sense:

BC Hydro Site C protest in Vancouver cancelled due to concerns about violence

And:

B.C. Hydro delays Site C job fair events in three northern B.C. communities, citing safety concerns

But I sure hope everyone’s keeping in mind just who’s being violent here!

Alaska Highway News seems to be doing the most thorough coverage of this, and where else is this being reported?  The man shot by RCMP outside the BC Hydro Site C meeting, about the proposed new dam project, was identified as James McIntire:

Police shooting victim identified as James McIntyre Victim was an employee at another Dawson Creek restaurant Jonny Wakefield , Mike Carter / Alaska Highway News
July 20, 2015 10:14 AM –

The B.C. Coroner’s Service has identified the man killed by police outside a Dawson Creek restaurant Thursday evening as James Daniel McIntyre, 48.

Officials say the man was a resident of Dawson Creek, and family members are asking for privacy.

McIntyre was shot dead after allegedly confronting police outside a Dawson Creek restaurant at around 6:30 July 16. Investigators say the man was wearing a mask and refused to drop a knife. 

Little is known about the man, but details are emerging, including that McIntyre worked as a dishwasher and cook’s assistant at Le’s Family Restaurant on 8th Street.

– See more at: http://www.alaskahighwaynews.ca/dawson-creek/police-shooting-victim-identified-as-james-mcintyre-1.2006178#sthash.j5kGpDXg.dpuf

From Vice Media: Everything We Know About the Death of an Anonymous “Comrade” in RCMP Shooting But wait… it gets weirder, an apartment was raided, and “I’m going to let you read between the lines on that” was the RCMP comment: Police raid apartment connected to Site C disruptor Search of building on 13th St. turns up ‘nothing’ Mike Carter , Jonny Wakefield / Alaska Highway News

July 20, 2015 10:08 AM

RCMP searched this Dawson Creek apartment building on 13th Street Saturday afternoon, in relation to a disruption at a Site C event and fatal police shooting just days earlier. Jonny Wakefield Photo

Police are releasing little information about a raid at a Dawson Creek apartment building Saturday connected with last week’s deadly police shooting.

According to North District RCMP, police searched an apartment building on 13th Street around noon as part of their investigation into the disturbance at a BC Hydro Site C open house Thursday night in the banquet hall of Fixx Urban Grill. 

RCMP media relations officer Dave Tyreman said police did not target a specific apartment and instead searched the entire building.

“Members attended that apartment building and searched it for public safety,” Tyreman said, stating, “I’m going to let you read between the lines on that.”

The search turned up nothing. 

“Nothing came of it. To us, it’s a moot point,” Tyreman added. 

Anonymous threat

It is unclear if the search was related to a threat received Saturday afternoon from the hacker group Anonymous.

The group released a statement that afternoon claiming the victim of the deadly police-involved shooting was one of their own, while swearing “vengeance.”

Tyreman couldn’t say much about the threat.

“We’re aware of the online information and currently reviewing it,” he said. “We get information and in this case we forward it on to the appropriate people and they’re reviewing it.”

The Coroners Service is expected to release the identity of the victim today.

– See more at: http://www.alaskahighwaynews.ca/dawson-creek/police-raid-apartment-connected-to-site-c-disruptor-1.2006137#sthash.GCbQ3H6v.dpuf

 

Categories: Citizens

Ch. 7829 Rulemaking Comments

Carol Overland - Legalectric - Mon, 07/20/2015 - 1:47pm

Today in the inbox, this DNR Comment on the Chapter 7829 Rulemaking appeared:

DNR 7829 Comment_20157-112548-01

Here’s the juicy part:

DOH!  Brilliant!  So I quick wrote this up and filed a few minutes ago:

Overland 7829 Comments July 2015

Agencies have contributed so much when they show up, and now the DNR and DOT do show up and it’s so much appreciated!  How can building the record and getting their comments in be anything but good!  Let’s do it!!  Let’s establish a distinct status for state agencies to participate in Public Utility Commission dockets!

 

Categories: Citizens

Beer Snobbery

Blowing and Drifting - Christopher Tassava - Sun, 07/19/2015 - 1:11pm

I’ve been lucky this month to have enjoyed some great new beers – perhaps too many, but what’s "too" mean? I enjoyed the first set of tasty brews while on a conference trip to Middletown, Connecticut, two weeks ago. I had an Allagash White with my lunchtime pizza. It’s a common-enough beer, but one I hadn’t had. It complemented the two massive slices of New York-style pizza perfectly.

Later that evening, out for dinner with friends and colleagues, I had two light, delicious, well-balanced Connecticut ales – Thomas Hooker’s blonde and Thimble Island’s American – which had one of the best labels I’ve ever seen:

Then, after dinner, we headed over to an interesting taproom just up the street, Eli Cannon’s, which I’d read about before the trip. The ambiance and decor was almost overwhelming, frankly, and the tap list was ridiculously long – something like 70 beers. I was excited to try some unknown dark beers from East Coast brewers, but I was surprised and a little disappointed to find that the list was dominated by pale ales and india pale ales. I tried to get a flight of dark beers, but could only get two that I hadn’t already drunk! Still, the two non-dark beers were both fine – Secret Agent X9, a Belgian by Middletown’s tiny Stubborn Beauty brewery, and Eli Cannon’s own 21st Anniversary ale – and the two new-to-me darks were great: Wolaver’s oatmeal stout out of Vermont and the Green Flash Silva Stout from San Diego (so much for the East Coast thing). I hadn’t heard of the first, but had long looked for the second, and enjoyed both of them very much. The Green Flash was especially good, a very deep vanilla-toned stout with just a hint of its bourbon-barrel aging.

After the conference goings-on each day, a revolving group of us went back to Eli Cannon’s for nightcaps. I had the Wolaver’s and the Green Flash again and on our last visit, the Mission Gose by Evil Twin. I’d had and enjoyed a couple Gose beers, but this was a crazy, insanely tart beer that was not at all the right thing at 10 p.m. in a dim taphouse. After dinner on a hot, sunny patio, yes. Having a super-low alcohol content, though, I felt okay about cleansing the palate with another glass of the Silva.

In addition to the beers at Eli Cannon’s, I was lucky to have some good stuff at the conference dinners, which are usually centered on wine – not my cup of tea. This year we could find good local stuff, including the outstanding coffee stout from Thimble Island and the Trappist ale from Spencer Brewery in Massachusetts. The Trappist was unusual and amazingly good – for me, an ideal dessert beer.

My sampling of regional beers didn’t end when I came home. My friend and colleague Ryan at Franklin & Marshall has a side business, A Case for Beer, in which he assembles twelve-pack "Flight Kits" of interesting local beers. I’d have loved to get his Connecticut kit, but flying home prevented this. I lucked out, though, when two other colleagues, Anne and Ann gave me the two darkest beers from their kit: the Smoke & Dagger Schwarzbier from Jack’s Abby in Massachusetts and the Raincloud porter from Foolproof in Rhode Island. Maybe partly because I had to smuggle them home, I found that both were exceptionally good beers. The Cloak & Dagger was maybe the blackest lager I’ve ever had, a heavy mouthful of smoke. The Raincloud also had a delicious smokiness, but it ended in a little hop kick, which was surprising and pleasant – and came in a pretty can:

All those great beers made July a great beer month, but then last night I went up to St. Paul to meet a friend at the Urban Growler, a new microbrewery in an industrial zone off the new light rail line.

All of their beers looked great, so I had a flight, which included their "flagship" cream ale, their IPA, and their "City Dale" session ale (all perfectly fine but not my thing) as well as three insanely great and creative beers. One was their smooth "De-Lovely" porter, which we enjoyed with a shot of coffee in it. The second was a Witbier made with rhubarb, which lent the beer a slightly sweet but understatedly tart flavor. The last, called the Sticky Rice, was something new to me: a Wit made with rice, mango, coconut, and ginger. I thought it was outstanding. The snap of the ginger made it ideal to sip on the darkening patio with lots of other happy beer-drinkers around. I’m eager to go up there again in a few months to try the new stuff on the menu.

Categories: Citizens

RCMP shoots hydro dam protester? Nope, misidentified!

Carol Overland - Legalectric - Sun, 07/19/2015 - 11:05am

.
When you’re challenging utility projects, be careful. The guy who was shot was misidentified, but he’s still dead, that won’t change…

There was someone disrupting the BC Hydro open house/meeting, tearing up maps, toppling easels, etc., and he was asked to leave and was escorted out. It seems it was another person who was shot! There’s been no claim that the disruptive person was armed or threatening anyone. There are reports that the man who was shot didn’t follow police instructions/didn’t listen to orders, something like that, and that he had a knife. SHOT?!?! KILLED?!?!

See below, confirmation that the “Site C protester” and the man who was shot are DIFFERENT PEOPLE!

Report from Red Power Media:

‘Guy Fawkes’ Masked Man Dead After RCMP Shooting at BC Hydro Open House

In the press:

Two men involved in fatal RCMP shooting in Dawson Creek (this one says he may had been involved in a domestic dispute in the bar)

Police say man shot in Dawson Creek was masked and aggressive (they’ve changed the headline on this article)

Anonymous issues warnings over Dawson Creek shooting


Dawson Creek police shoot man who refused to throw weapon away, witness claims

Fatal shooting in Dawson Creek not connected to “Site C”

RCMP fatally shoot man at BC Hydro information session

Two men involved in fatal RCMP shooting in Dawson Creek

Here’s the witness’ video, he saw them shoot him and started recording:

OH, CANADA…

Press conference – IIO’s Kellie Kilpatrick, executive director of public accountability with the Independent Investigations Office:

Site C protester and shooting victim were not the same man

Nearly 24 hours after a police shooting left a man dead outside a Dawson Creek restaurant, B.C.’s law enforcement watchdog was convinced the victim and a man who disrupted a Site C dam open house inside were one and the same.

They were not.

“We verified, verified, verified. At two o’clock I was told the same guy, at three o’clock I was told the same guy, then I land in Dawson Creek and I’m told ‘different guy,'” said Kellie Kilpatrick, executive director of public accountability with the Independent Investigations Office (IIO) at a media conference at 7 p.m. Friday.

Thursday night, the IIO and RCMP said the shooting occurred outside a public information session on the Site C dam, and that the man who was killed was “believed to be connected” to the disturbance inside.

Instead, the man who reportedly flipped tables and destroyed maps at the BC Hydro event is alive, while another is dead.

The IIO could not yet confirm what the victim was doing at the Fixx Urban Grill restaurant on the evening of July 16, but said he had a knife. Police shot the man after he acted aggressively and refused to comply with police instructions. He died shortly after. Little is known about him, as investigators have not released his name.

As for what investigators know about the man at the Site C event: “He’s alive,” Kilpatrick said.

According to Kilpatrick, the Dawson Creek investigation has been one of the most complex the office has encountered since it was created in 2012.

“Since the beginning of the operations of the IIO, we’ve not seen a case that has quite as many moving parts as this one,” she said.

“The RCMP as well as the IIO spent close to four hours last night confirming what we thought was the most relevant, most accurate information. To come speak to you now almost 24 hours later, and provide a significant change in the information is not something we typically find ourselves dealing with.

“That’s a fairly substantive clarification that needed to be made.”

It was a remarkable turn in a day that saw Dawson Creek and its police force thrust into the spotlight, and one of the most controversial projects in B.C. linked to a police shooting.

At about 6:30 p.m. Thursday, police shot and killed the man outside the front door of the Fixx restaurant. A video of the aftermath emerged online, showing officers with guns pointed at the man, who appeared to be holding a knife.

An open house about construction of the controversial $8.8-billion Site C dam was taking place in banquet facilities of the restaurant that evening.

According to an attendee, a man flipped tables and tore display boards illustrating the dam from their stands before being escorted out of the room.

Curtis Pratt was inside and said he did not hear shots, but later saw the body. He said the victim was wearing a mask, and he wasn’t sure whether it was the man from inside.

Kilpatrick did not have additional information about the protestor, but said “he never did come into contact with police.”

Her office is continuing to investigate the shooting. The officers involved have been sequestered, and it is not clear whether they will be charged, suspended or placed on administrative leave. The IIO also said investigators were not sure if the officers had tasers or other lesser means of force, which will be a key part of the investigation.

“That’s something our investigators have been following up on today. I don’t have the answer to that,” Kilpatrick said.

“What an officer carries on his toolbelt varies depending on officer location, detachment and the type of work they are doing.”

What is clear is that “police came in response to the disturbance and found themselves in contact with this other individual,” Kilpatrick said.

The IIO is asking anyone with information about what happened in the area to come forward, saying cell phone videos are of particular interest.

“In this day of social media, we aware that there is a lot of information circulating out there,” Kilpatrick said. “We’re very interested in speaking with anyone who has information about what they saw or what they heard here last evening,” she added.

Anyone with information is asked to call the IIO at 1-855-446-TIPS.

Categories: Citizens

Top Three Garden Stars

My Northern Garden - Mary Schier - Fri, 07/17/2015 - 7:59am

The Northfield Garden Tour of 2015 is finished, and I really enjoyed having so many visitors to my yard. It’s interesting to see what people ask about when they are on a tour–and I had three items that lots of folks were especially interested in.

What’s this pretty orange annual?

Probably the most asked about bloom in the garden were these Campfire™ Fireburst bidens, which are an annual that I am testing for plant wholesaler Proven Winners as part of its garden writers trial plant program. Campfire is one of the most productive, bright annuals that I’ve ever tried and I think it is indeed a winner. The shades of yellow and orange brightened up the small herb bed that I have at the front of my house. I’m growing them in pots, but you could certainly grow them in the front of a bed as well. These are not on the market yet, but will be in nurseries and garden centers in 2016.

Is this a shrub?

Not really. I have several Twilite Prairieblues baptisia around my front yard, which are perennials that act like shrubs. I love baptisia (also called false indigo) because it is a prairie plant that the bees love. It blooms in June with purple flowers on spikes. There are white and even yellow baptisias, but I like the purple/blue ones. After blooming, the plant forms seed pods, which eventually turn black. I leave mine standing all winter, and sometimes shake the seedpods, which make a rattling noise. In spring, I cut the plants back. This can get to be a big plant (more than 4 feet high and almost that wide), so they may require some tying up or pruning back. I use half-hoops and bungee cords (one of the most under-rated garden tools around) to keep mine upright and looking pretty.

Can you eat these?

Yes, you can! They are sour cherries. My cherry tree was full of ripe berries and quite a few garden visitors sampled the fruit. I really like my little Bali cherry tree, which is a handsome, short tree in the front yard. After the tour, I went out and picked a couple of gallons of additional cherries. The rest are pretty ripe or hard to reach, so I left them for the birds to enjoy.

Now that the tour is over, it’s time to relax and enjoy the garden.

 

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